Etymology
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scat (interj.)

"go away!" usually addressed to a small animal, 1838, via quicker than s'cat "in a great hurry," in which the word probably represents a hiss followed by the word cat.

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scat (n.1)

"nonsense patter sung to jazz," 1926, probably of imitative origin, from one of the syllables used. As a verb, by 1935. Related: Scatting.

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scat (n.2)

"filth, dung," by 1950, from Greek stem skat- "dung" (see scatology).

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doo-wop 

style of American vocal group music, usually performed acapella or with minimal instrumentation, 1958, from a typical example of the nonsense harmony phrases sung under the vocal lead (this one, doo-wop, being attested from mid-1950s). Compare bebop, scat (n.1).

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