Etymology
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Saratoga 

place in New York state, early recorded as saraghtogo and apparently the name is from an Iroquoian language, but it is of unknown meaning. In reference to a kind of large trunk by 1858; so called because it was much used by ladies traveling to the summer resort of Saratoga.

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blubbering (adj.)

c. 1400, "bubbling, gurgling," present-participle adjective from blubber (v.). Originally of fountains, springs, etc. Of weeping from 1580s.

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balneal (adj.)

"pertaining to baths," 1640s, with -al (1) + Latin balneum "bath," from Greek balaneion "warm bath, bathing room," which is of unknown origin. Balneography (1841) is the description of baths and medicinal springs.

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mud-bath (n.)

"mud transfused with saline or other ingredients at mineral springs, into which patients suffering from rheumatism, etc., immerse themselves," 1798, from mud (n.) + bath (n.).

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sinter (n.)

"encrustation on rocks deposited by precipitation from mineral water," at springs, etc., 1780, from German Sinter, which is cognate with English cinder. Related: Sintered; sintering.

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Deely-bobber (n.)

"headband with two springs carrying ornaments," 1982, trademark name held by Ace Novelty Company. Earlier it had been a patent name for a type of building blocks, manufactured 1969-1973.

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spa (n.)

"medicinal or mineral spring," 1620s, from the name of the health resort in eastern Belgium, known since 14c., that features mineral springs believed to have curative properties. The place name is from Walloon espa "spring, fountain." As "commercial establishment offering health and beauty treatments," 1960.

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Vichy (adj.)

in reference to collaborationist government of France, 1940, from the name of the city in department of Allier in central France, famous for mineral springs, seat 1940-44 of the French government formed under Nazi occupation and headed by Pétain. The place name is of uncertain origin.

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thermal (adj.)

1756, "having to do with hot springs," from French thermal (Buffon), from Greek therme "heat, feverish heat," from PIE root *gwher- "to heat, warm." Sense of "having to do with heat" is first recorded 1837. The noun meaning "rising current of relatively warm air" is recorded from 1933.

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geyser (n.)

1780, extended from Icelandic Geysir, name of a specific hot spring in the valley of Haukadal, literally "the gusher," from Old Norse geysa "to gush," from Proto-Germanic *gausjan, suffixed form of PIE *gheus-, extended form of the root *gheu- "to pour." Taken by foreign writers as the generic name for spouting hot springs, for which the native Icelandic words are hverr "a cauldron," laug "a hot bath."

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