Etymology
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rupture (n.)

late 14c., in medicine, "act of bursting or breaking," in reference to a vessel, etc. of the body, from Old French rupture and directly from Latin ruptura "the breaking (of a vein), fracture (of an arm or leg)," from past-participle stem of rumpere "to break" (from PIE root *runp- "to break;" see corrupt (adj.)).

Specifically as "abdominal hernia" from early 15c. The sense of "breach of friendly relations or concord" is by 1580s; the general sense of "act or fact of breaking or bursting" is by 1640s. Rupturewort (1590s) was held to be efficacious in treating hernias, etc.

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rupture (v.)

1739, in medicine, "to break, burst" (a vessel, etc.), from rupture (n.). The intransitive sense of "suffer a break" is by 1863. Related: Ruptured; rupturing. The old verb was rupt (Middle English rupten, in medicine, early 15c.), from Latin ruptus. Ruptured duck (1945) was U.S. GI's dismissive term (based on its design) for the discharge button they were awarded. Earlier it was used in a sense of "a damaged aircraft" (1930). Compare lame duck.

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erupt (v.)

1650s, of diseases, etc., from Latin eruptus, past participle of erumpere "to break out, burst," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + rumpere "to break, rupture" (see rupture (n.)). Of volcanoes, from 1770 (the Latin word was used in reference to Mount Etna). Related: Erupted; erupting.

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eruption (n.)

early 15c., erupcioun, from Old French éruption (14c.) and directly from Latin eruptionem (nominative eruptio) "a breaking out," noun of action from past-participle stem of erumpere "break out, burst forth," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + rumpere "to break, rupture" (see rupture (n.)).

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irruption (n.)

1570s, from French irruption (14c.) or directly from Latin irruptionem (nominative irruptio) "a breaking in, bursting in, invasion," noun of action from past-participle stem of irrumpere "to break in, force one's way in, burst into," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + rumpere (see rupture (n.)). Frequently confused with eruption.

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interrupt (v.)

c. 1400, "to interfere with a legal right," from Latin interruptus, past participle of interrumpere "break apart, break off, break through," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rumpere "to break" (see rupture (n.), and compare corrupt (adj.)). Meaning "to break into, break in upon, disturb the action of" (especially of speech) is from early 15c. in English (it is also in Latin). Related: Interrupted; interrupting.

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route (n.)

c. 1200, "a way, a road, space for passage," from Old French rute "road, way, path" (12c.), from Latin rupta (via) "(a road) opened by force," broken or cut through a forest, etc., from rupta, fem. past participle of rumpere "to break" (see rupture (n.)).

The sense of "fixed or regular course for carrying things" (originally and for long especially postal, as in mail route) is from 1792, an extension of the meaning "customary path of animals" (early 15c.) itself later extended to sales, collections, delivery of milk or newspapers, etc. OED says the pronunciation that rhymes with "stout" appeared early 19c.

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bankrupt (adj.)

"in the state of one unable to pay just debts or meet obligations," 1560s, from Italian banca rotta, literally "a broken bench," from banca "moneylender's shop," literally "bench" (see bank (n.1)) + rotta "broken, defeated, interrupted" from (and in English remodeled on) Latin rupta, fem. past participle of rumpere "to break" (see rupture (n.)). Said to have been so called from an old custom of breaking the bench of bankrupts, but the allusion probably is figurative. The modern figurative (non-financial) sense in English is from 1580s. As a noun, "insolvent person," from 1530s.

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rutter (n.)

c. 1500, "trooper, dragoon, horse-soldier," from Old French routier "a highwayman," also "experienced soldier," a word taken into Old French from Medieval Latin ruptarius, rutarius, a name for a band of irregular soldiers or mercenaries, from Vulgar Latin rupta "a dispersed group," literally "a broken group," from noun use of Latin rupta, fem. past participle of rumpere "to break" (see rupture (n.)).

The French word also is the source of Dutch ruiter, German Reuter "trooper, horseman." In French partly conformed to route, and in German to Reiter "rider;" Ritter "knight." Related: Rutterkin "swaggering gallant, bully" (1520s).

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rout (n.)

1590s, "a defeat (of an army, etc.) followed by disorderly retreat," from French route "disorderly flight of troops," literally "a breaking off, rupture," from Vulgar Latin *rupta "a dispersed group," literally "a broken group," from noun use of Latin rupta, fem. past participle of rumpere "to break" (see rupture (n.)).

The archaic English noun rout "group of persons, assemblage," is the same word, from Anglo-French rute, Old French route "host, troop, crowd," from Vulgar Latin rupta "a dispersed group," here with sense of "a division, a detachment." It came to English meaning "group of soldiers" (early 13c.), also "gang of outlaws or rioters, mob" (c. 1300) before the more general sense developed 14c.: "large social assemblage, a general gathering of guests for entertainment." But it also kept its sense of "disorderly or confused mass of persons, the rabble," and was a legal term in this meaning. A rout-cake (1807) was one baked for use at a reception.

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