Etymology
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routine (n.)

"customary course of action; more or less mechanical performance of certain acts or duties," 1670s, from French routine "usual course of action, beaten path" (16c.), from route "way, path, course" (see route (n.)) + noun suffix -ine (see -ine (1)). The theatrical or athletic performance sense of "carefully rehearsed sequence of actions" is by 1926. The adjective, "of a mechanical or unvaried character, habitually done in the same way" is attested by 1817, from the noun. Related: Routinely.

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routinization (n.)

"a being or becoming routine; action of imposing a routine upon," 1916, noun of action from routinize "subject to a routine, make into a routine" (1893), from routine + -ize.

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register (n.2)
"assistant court officer in administrative or routine function," 1530s, now chiefly U.S., alteration of registrar (q.v) due to influence of register.
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humdrum (adj.)
"routine, monotonous, dull, commonplace," 1550s, probably a reduplication of hum. As a noun, "monotony, tediousness," from 1727; earlier it meant "dull person" (1590s).
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red tape (n.)

"official routine or formula," especially "excessive bureaucratic rigmarole," 1736, in reference to the red tape formerly used in Great Britain (and the American colonies) for binding up legal and other official documents, which is mentioned from 1690s.

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service (v.)

1893, "to provide with service," from service (n.1). Middle English servisen was "to serve (someone) as a knight or retainer" (c. 1300), from the noun, but it seems to have died with the feudal system and the modern verb likely is a re-coinage. Meaning "perform routine maintenance work on" is by 1926. Related: Serviced; servicing.

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shtick (n.)

also schtick, 1959, in theater jargon, "stage routine, characteristic act or joke," from Yiddish shtik "an act, gimmick," literally "a piece, a slice," from Middle High German stücke "a piece, play" (Modern German Stück "piece"), from Old High German stucki (see stock (n.1)).

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cut (adj.)

"formed or fashioned as if by cutting or carving," 1510s, past-participle adjective from cut (v.). Meaning "hewn, chiseled" (of stone, etc.) is from 1670s. Meaning "gashed with a sharp instrument" is from 1660s.

Cut and dried is by 1770 in the figurative sense "routine, boring," a reference to herbs in shops as opposed to growing in the wild.

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groovy (adj.)
1850, "pertaining to a groove," from groove (n.) + -y (2). Slang sense of "first-rate, excellent" is 1937, American English, from jazz slang phrase in the groove (1932) "performing well (without grandstanding)." As teen slang for "wonderful," it dates from c. 1941; popularized 1960s, out of currency by 1980. Earlier colloquial figurative sense was "having a tendency to routine, inclined to a specialized and narrow way of life or thought" (1882). Related: Grooviness.
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groove (n.)
c. 1400, "cave; mine; pit dug in the earth" (late 13c. in place names), from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse grod "pit," or from Middle Dutch groeve "furrow, ditch" (Modern Dutch groef), both from Proto-Germanic *grobo (source also of Old Norse grof "brook, river bed," Old High German gruoba "ditch," German Grube "a pit, hole, ditch, grave," Gothic groba "pit, cave," Old English græf "ditch, grave"), from PIE root *ghrebh- (2) "to dig, bury, scratch" (see grave (n.)). Sense of "long, narrow channel or furrow," especially as cut by a tool, is 1650s. Meaning "spiral cut in a phonograph record" is from 1902. Figurative sense of "routine" is from 1842, often deprecatory at first, "a rut."
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