Etymology
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rouse (v.)

mid-15c., rousen, intransitive, probably from Anglo-French or Old French reuser, ruser; Middle English Compendium compares 16c. French rousee "abrupt movement." Sometimes also said to be from Latin recusare "refuse, decline," with loss of the medial -c-. Originally in English a technical term in hawking, "to shaking the feathers of the body," but like many medieval hawking and hunting terms it is of obscure origin.

The sense of "cause game to rise from cover or lair" is from 1520s. The word became general from 16c. in the figurative, transitive, meaning "stir up, cause to start up by noise or clamor, provoke to activity; waken from torpor or inaction" (1580s); that of "to awaken, cause to start from slumber or repose" is recorded by 1590s. Related: Roused; rousing.

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rousing (adj.)

"having the power to excite or astonish," 1640s, present-participle adjective from rouse (v.).

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arouse (v.)

1590s, "awaken, stir to action" (transitive), from a- (1) "on" + rouse. Related: Aroused; arousing.

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rouser (n.)

"one who or that which excites into action," 1610s, agent noun from rouse (v.). Also colloquially, "something exciting or astonishing" (by 1839).

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roust (v.)

"raise or arouse, stir up" (from one's bed, etc.), 1650s, probably an alteration of rouse with excrescent -t. Related: Rousted; rousting.

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rabble-rouser (n.)

"demagogue, one who arouses the emotions of a disorderly crowd," 1842, agent noun from rabble-rousing, which is attested by 1802 as an adjective (in Sydney Smith), by 1933 as a noun; see rabble (n.1) + rouse (v.).

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row (n.2)

"noisy commotion," 1746, Cambridge student slang, of uncertain origin, perhaps related to rousel "drinking bout" (c. 1600), a shortened form of carousal. Klein suggests a back-formation from rouse (n.), mistaken as a plural (compare pea from pease).

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excite (v.)

mid-14c., exciten, "to move, stir up, instigate," from Old French esciter (12c.) or directly from Latin excitare "rouse, call out, summon forth, produce," frequentative of exciere "call forth, instigate," from ex "out" (see ex-) + ciere "set in motion, call" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion"). Of feelings, "to stir up, rouse," from late 14c. Of bodily organs or tissues, from 1831. Sense of "rouse the emotions of, emotionally agitate" is attested from 1821.

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Ira 

masc. proper name, from Hebrew, literally "watchful," from stem of 'ur "to awake, to rouse oneself."

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stimulate (v.)

1610s, "rouse to action," from Latin stimulatus, past participle of stimulare (see stimulation). Related: Stimulated; stimulating.

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