Etymology
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mechanism (n.)

1660s, "the structure of a machine, engine, or other contrivance for controlling or utilizing natural forces," from Modern Latin mechanismus, from Greek mēkhanē "machine, instrument, device" (see machine (n.)). Sense of "a mechanical contrivance or agency of any kind" is from 1670s.

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Rototiller (n.)

machine with rotating blades to break up soil, 1923, from roto-, perhaps based on the mechanical use of rotor, + tiller

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uptick (n.)
"upward trend," 1962, an economist's term, from up (adv.) + tick (v.), in reference to some recording mechanism.
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gyrostatics (n.)
branch of dynamics dealing with rotating bodies, 1883, from gyrostatic (1875); see gyrostat + -ics.
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revolving (adj.)

"making revolutions, rotating," 1690s, present-participle adjective from revolve (v.). Revolving door is attested from 1856 in industrial processes, 1896 in buildings.

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motorcar (n.)

also motor-car, "horseless carriage, wheeled vehicle which carries its own propelling mechanism," 1895 from motor (n.) + car.

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spacer (n.)
typewriter mechanism and key, 1882, agent noun from space (v.).
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silencer (n.)
c. 1600, "person who silences," agent noun from silence (v.). Meaning "mechanism that stifles the sound of a motor or firearm" is from 1898.
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rotor (n.)

1873, an irregular shortening of rotator, originally in mathematics. Mechanical sense of "rotating part of a motor" is attested by 1903; specifically of helicopters from 1930.

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crankshaft (n.)

also crank-shaft, "shaft turned by a crank," 1803, from crank (v.) + shaft (n.). The basic form of the mechanism appears to date from Roman times.

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