Etymology
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roomy (adj.)

"having ample room, spacious, capacious," 1620s, from room (n.) + -y (2). Related: Roominess. Also used in this sense was roomsome (1580s); the earlier adjective simply was room (Middle English roum, Old English rum) "wide, broad, large, spacious."

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spacious (adj.)

late 14c., from Old French spacios, espacios "roomy, spacious, extensive" (12c., Modern French spacieux), or directly from Latin spatiosus "roomy, ample" (Medieval Latin spaciosus), from spatium "room, space" (see space (n.)). Related: Spaciously; spaciousness.

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commodious (adj.)

early 15c., "beneficial, convenient," from Old French commodios and directly from Medieval Latin commodiosus "convenient, useful," from Latin commodus "proper, fit, appropriate, convenient, satisfactory,"  from com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + modus "measure, manner" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures"). Meaning "conveniently roomy, spacious" is attested from 1550s. Related: Commodiously; commodiousness.

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spacy (adj.)

also spacey, 1852, "large, roomy, spacious," from space (n.) + -y (2). Meaning "felt as characteristic of outer space" (especially with reference to electronic music) is attested from 1971, probably influenced by spaced-out (1965, American English slang), a reference to the behavior of people using hallucinogenic drugs (see space (v.)).

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lax (adj.)

c. 1400, "loose" (in reference to bowels), from Latin laxus "wide, spacious, roomy," figuratively "loose, free, wide" (also used of indulgent rule and low prices), from PIE *lag-so-, suffixed form of root *sleg- "be slack, be languid."

In English, of rules, discipline, etc., from mid-15c. Related: Laxly; laxness. A transposed Vulgar Latin form yielded Old French lasche, French lâche. The laxists, though they formed no avowed school, were nonetheless condemned by Innocent XI in 1679.

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*sleg- 

*slēg-, also *lēg-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "be slack, be languid."

It forms all or part of: algolagnia; catalectic; laches; languid; languish; lax; lease; lessor; lush; relax; release; relish; slack (adj.); sleep.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek legein "to leave off, stop," lagnein "to lust;" Latin languere "to be faint, weary," laxus "wide, spacious, roomy;" Old Church Slavonic slabu "lax, weak;" Lithuanian silpnas "weak."

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room (n.)

Middle English roum, from Old English rum "space, extent; sufficient space, fit occasion (to do something)," from Proto-Germanic *ruman (source also of Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old High German, Gothic rum, German Raum "space," Dutch ruim "hold of a ship, nave"), nouns formed from Germanic adjective *ruma- "roomy, spacious," from PIE root *reue- (1) "to open; space" (source also of Avestan ravah- "space," Latin rus "open country," Old Irish roi, roe "plain field," Old Church Slavonic ravinu "level," Russian ravnina "a plain").

Old English also had a frequent adjective rum "roomy, wide, long, spacious," also an adverb, rumlice "bigly, corpulently" (Middle English roumli).

The meaning "chamber, cabin" is recorded by early 14c. as a nautical term; applied by mid-15c. to interior division of a building separated by walls or partitions; the Old English word for this was cofa, ancestor of cove. The sense of "persons assembled in a room" is by 1712.

Make room "open a passage, make way" is from mid-15c.  Room-service is attested from 1913; room-temperature, comfortable for the occupants of a room, is so called from 1879. Roomth "sufficient space" (1530s, with -th (2)) now is obsolete.

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capable (adj.)

"sufficiently able, having power or capacity, qualified," 1590s, from French capable "able, sufficient; able to hold," or directly from Late Latin capabilis "receptive; able to grasp or hold," used by theologians, from Latin capax "able to hold much, broad, wide, roomy;" also "receptive, fit for;" adjectival form of capere "to grasp, lay hold, take, catch; undertake; take in, hold; be large enough for; comprehend" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp"). Other late 16c. senses in English, now obsolete, were "able to comprehend; able to contain; extensive." Related: Capably.

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