Etymology
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roaring (adj.)

"that roars or bellows; making or characterized by noise or disturbance," late 14c., present-participle adjective from roar (v.). Used of periods of years characterized by noisy revelry, especially roaring twenties (1930, which OED credits to "postwar buoyancy"); but also, in Australia, roaring fifties (1892, in reference to the New South Wales gold rush of 1851). Roaring Forties in reference to exceptionally rough seas between latitudes 40 and 50 south, is attested from 1841.

The "roaring fifties" are still remembered as the days when Australia held a prosperity never equalled in the world's history and a touch of romance as well. The gold fever never passed away from the land. [E.C. Buley, "Australian Life in Town and Country," 1905]
Roaring boys, roaring lads, swaggerers : ruffians : slang names applied, about the beginning of the seventeenth century, to the noisy, riotous roisterers who infested the taverns and the streets of London, and, in general, acted the part of the Mohocks of a century later. Roaring girls are also alluded to by the old dramatists, though much less frequently. [Century Dictionary]

This is from the use of roar (v.) in old London slang for "behave in a riotous and bullying manner" (1580s).

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rip (n.1)

1711, "rent made by ripping or tearing," from rip (v.). The U.S. colloquial meaning "a rapid rush" is by 1855. The parachutist's rip cord (1906) originally was a device in ballooning to open a panel and release the hot air (1868, also ripping-cord).

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rip (v.)

"tear apart, cut open or off," c. 1400, rippen, "pull out sutures," probably from a North Sea Germanic language (compare Flemish rippen "strip off roughly," Frisian rippe "to tear, rip;" also Middle Dutch reppen, rippen "to rip") or else from a Scandinavian source (compare Swedish reppa, Danish rippe "to tear, rip"). Likely most or all of them are from a Proto-Germanic *rupjan- (from PIE root *reup-, *reub- "to snatch"). "Of somewhat obscure origin and history; it is not quite certain that all the senses really belong to the same word" [OED].

The meaning "to slash with a sharp instrument" is from 1570s. Intransitive sense of "be torn or split open" is by 1840. Related: Ripped; ripping. In old U.S. slang, "to utter strong language" (1772), often with out; hence "break forth with sudden violence." The meaning "to move with slashing force" (1798) is the sense in let her rip "allow something to go or continue unrestrained," an American English colloquial phrase attested by 1846.

At another time, when a charge was ordered one of the officers could not think of the word, and he shouted—'Let 'er rip!'—when the whole line burst out with a yell—'Let 'er rip!' and dashed in among the Mexicans, laughing and shouting this new battle cry. [from an account of Illinois volunteers in the Mexican-American War, in the Pensacola Gazette, March 29, 1851] 

  

In garments we rip along the line at which they were sewed ; we tear the texture of the cloth; we say, "It is not torn; it is only ripped." More broadly, rip, especially with up, stands for a cutting open or apart with a quick, deep strike: as, to rip up a body or a sack of meal. Rend implies great force or violence. [Century Dictionary]
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rip (n.2)

"rough water, ridge-like water," 1775, perhaps a special use of rip (v.); also compare rip-rap. Originally of seas; application to rivers is from 1828.

Hence rip tide (by 1862), which seems at first to have been applied to strong tidal flows, as in the Pacific Northwest. An 1896 letter from Alaska, published in a California newspaper, describes a rip tide as  "a rapid tide against a strong wind, producing choppy seas and an undercurrent, which renders a small boat unmanageable." By 1907, with the rise in popularity of ocean bathing, it came to be applied to dangerous intermittent strong currents flowing straight out from shore and can drag even strong swimmers to death by drowning. For this, precisians prefer the more accurate rip current, introduced for the purpose in 1936, but rip tide remains the popular term.

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rip (n.3)

"thing of little value," 1815, earlier "inferior or worn-out horse" (1778, though OED regards this earlier appearance as "prob. accidental"), a word of uncertain origin, perhaps altered from slang rep "man of loose character; vicious, reckless and worthless person" (1747), which itself is of obscure origin, perhaps short for reprobate (n.). But also compare demi-rep "woman of dubious virtue" (1749, the second element said to be short for reputation).

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rip-tide (n.)

also riptide, 1862, "strong tidal flow in a coastal channel, etc.;" see rip (n.2). Since early 20c. it has been used mostly of strong currents flowing straight out from shore, which are not tides, and the attempt to correct it in that sense to rip current dates from 1936.

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rip-rap (n.)

also riprap, "loose stone thrown down in water or soft ground as foundation," 1822, American English, perhaps connected with earlier nautical word rip-rap meaning "stretch of rippling water" (often caused by underwater elevations), 1660s, which is perhaps of imitative origin (compare riprap "a sharp blow," 1570s). Also compare rip (n.2).

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rip-off (n.)

"an act of fraud, a swindle," 1969, from verbal phrase rip off "to steal or rob" (c. 1967) in African-American vernacular, from rip (v.) + off (adv.). Rip was prison slang for "to steal" since 1904, and was also used in this sense in 12c. The specific meaning "an exploitative imitation" is from 1971, also "a plagiarism." Related: Ripped-off.

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rip-saw (n.)

"a hand-saw the teeth of which have more rake and less set than a cross-cut saw, used for cutting wood in the direction of the grain" [Century Dictionary], 1846, from rip (n.) "split timber" (see rip (v.) + saw (n.1)).

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Rip Van Winkle 

"person out of touch with current conditions," 1829, the name of the character in Washington Irving's popular Catskills tale (published 1819) of the henpecked husband who sleeps enchanted for 20 years and finds the world has forgotten him.

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