Advertisement
27 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
rim (n.)

Old English rima "edge, border, verge, coast," as in særima "seashore," literally "rim of the sea," and dægrima "dawn," literally "rim of the day." Related to Old Norse rime, rimi "a raised strip of land, ridge," Old Frisian rim "edge." "There are app. no parallel forms in the other Teutonic languages" [OED]. but with no other known cognates.

As "the circular part farthest from the axis of a wheel," c. 1400. The general sense of "border or edge of anything," typically a circular border raised above the enclosed surface, is by c. 1600. The snare drummer's rim shot (striking the rim and the head at once) is recorded from 1934. In political geography, rimland for "peripheral region of political or strategic significance" is by 1944.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
rim (v.)

1794, "to fit with a rim, surround with a rim or border," from rim (n.). Sexual senses from 1920s, some perhaps influenced by ream (v.). Related: Rimmed; rimming.

Related entries & more 
rimless (adj.)

"having no rim or rims" (of spectacles, etc.), by 1802, from rim (n.) + -less.

Related entries & more 
felloe (n.)
"rim of a spoked wheel," early 15c., variant of felie (c. 1200), from Old English felga, plural of felg "rim of a wheel," from Proto-Germanic *felz- (source also of Old Saxon felga, Middle Dutch velge, Dutch velg, Old High German felga, German Felge).
Related entries & more 
rand (n.)

1839 in South African English, rant, "rocky ridge overlooking a river valley," from Afrikaans, from Dutch rand "edge, margin, rim," from Proto-Germanic *randaz "edge, rim, crust" (source also of Old English rand "brink, bank," Old High German rant "border or rim of a shield," German Rand "edge, border, margin," Old Norse rönd "shield-rim, shield," Swedish rand "stripe, edge, verge").

As a unit of currency, adopted by the Republic of South Africa in 1961 (see Krugerrand). Johnson's dictionary has rand "Border; seam: as the rand of a woman's shoe." The Old English cognate survived into Middle English as rand "strip or border of land."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
seashore (n.)
also sea-shore, 1520s, from sea + shore (n.). Old English used særima "sea-rim," sæ-strande, etc.
Related entries & more 
popover (n.)

also pop-over, "light cake," 1859, from pop (v.) + over (adv.). Perhaps so called because it swells over the rim of the tin when baked.

Related entries & more 
sprocket (n.)
1530s, originally a carpenters' word for a piece of timber used in framing, of unknown origin. The meaning "projection from the rim of a wheel that engages the links of a chain" is first recorded 1750.
Related entries & more 
tarsus (n.)
the ankle bones collectively, 1670s, Modern Latin, from Greek tarsos "ankle, sole of the foot, rim of the eyelid," originally "flat surface, especially for drying," from PIE root *ters- "to dry." The connecting notion is the bones of the "flat" of the foot (Greek tarsos podos).
Related entries & more 
flange (n.)
1680s, "a widening or branching out," of unknown origin, perhaps related to Old French flanche "flank, hip, side," fem. of flanc (see flank (n.)). Meaning "projecting rim, etc., used for strength or guidance" is from 1735. As a verb from 1820.
Related entries & more