Etymology
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habit (n.)

early 13c., "characteristic attire of a religious or clerical order," from Old French habit, abit "clothing, (ecclesiastical) habit; conduct" (12c.), from Latin habitus "condition, demeanor, appearance, dress," originally past participle of habere "to have, hold, possess; wear; find oneself, be situated; consider, think, reason, have in mind; manage, keep," from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive."

Habit is a custom continued so steadily as to develop a tendency or inclination, physical or moral, to keep it up; as, the habit of early rising; the habit of smoking. Habit and practice apply more often to the acts of an individual; fashion and usage more often to many .... [Century Dictionary]

Meaning "clothing generally" is from late 14c. Meaning "customary practice, usual mode of action" is early 14c. Drug sense is from 1887. The Latin word was applied to both inner and outer states of being, and both senses were taken in English, though meaning of "dress" now is restricted to monks and nuns. In 19c. it also was used of the costume worn by women when riding on horseback.

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riding (n.2)

one of the three districts, anciently under the government of a reeve,  into which Yorkshire was divided, late 13c., from late Old English *þriðing, a relic of Viking rule, from Old Norse ðriðjungr "third part," from ðriði "third" (see third).

The initial consonant apparently was merged by misdivision with final consonant of preceding north, west, or east.

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habit (v.)

mid-14c., "to dwell, reside; dwell in" (obsolete), from Old French habiter, abiter "to dwell, inhabit; have dealings with," from Latin habitare "to live, dwell; stay, remain," frequentative of habere "to have, to hold, possess" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). Meaning "to dress" is from 1580s. Related: Habited; habiting.

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riding (n.1)

c. 1300, "an act of riding on horseback," especially in a festival procession, verbal noun from ride (v.). Meaning "teasing, annoying" is from 1927. As an adjective, "suitable for or associated with riding," Old English ridende. Riding-hood, originally a large hood worn by women when riding or exposed to weather, is from mid-15c., later a fashionable article of outdoor wear (18c.). Riding-boots, kind of high boots worn in riding, is from 1630s.

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flaunt (n.)

1620s, "act or habit of flaunting," from flaunt (v.).

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lisp (n.)

"act or habit of lisping," 1620s, from lisp (v.).

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tubing (n.)

recreational pastime of riding a river on a truck tire inner tube, 1975; see tube (n.).

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bicycling (n.)

"art or practice of riding on a bicycle," 1869, verbal noun from bicycle (v.), for which see bicycle (n.).

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thew (n.)

Old English þeaw "usage, custom, habit;" see thews.

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