Etymology
Advertisement
fuller (n.)

"one who fulls cloth," Old English fullere "fuller" (Mark ix.3), from Latin fullo "fuller" (see foil (v.)). The native word is walker. Fuller's earth (silicate of alumina) is recorded by 1520s; so called because it was used in cleansing cloth.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Richard 

masc. proper name, Middle English Rycharde, from Old French Richard, from Old High German Ricohard "strong in rule," from Proto-Germanic *rik- "ruler" (see rich) + *harthu "hard," from PIE *kar-o- (from PIE root *kar- "hard"). "One of the most popular names introduced by the Normans. Usually Latinized as Ricardus, the common form was Ricard, whence the pet form Rick, etc." ["Dictionary of English Surnames"]

Related entries & more 
intruder (n.)

1530s, agent noun from intrude. Originally legal. Fuller ("Pisgah-Sight of Palestine," 1650) has fem. form intrudress.

Related entries & more 
brigadier (n.)

1670s, "officer in command of a brigade," from French brigadier, from brigade "body of soldiers" (see brigade). Brigadier-general is the fuller form of the title.

Related entries & more 
an- (1)

privative prefix, from Greek an-, "not, without" (from PIE root *ne- "not"). The Greek prefix is a fuller form of the one represented in English by a- (3).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
constancy (n.)

1520s, "fixedness or firmness of mind," a fuller form of constance (q.v.) with abstract noun suffix -cy. Meaning "faithfulness, fidelity" (to a person or cause) is from 1540s; that of quality of immutability, a permanent state" is from c. 1600.

Related entries & more 
discontent (n.)

"state or feeling of mental dissatisfaction, uneasiness of mind," 1580s, from dis- "opposite of" + content (n.). Winter of our discontent is from "Richard III" (1594).

Related entries & more 
ribosome (n.)

1958, coined by U.S. microbiologist Richard B. Roberts (1910-1980) from ribo(nucleic acid) + -some "body" (see somato-). Related: Ribosomal.

Related entries & more 
EPA 

initialism (acronym) for Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. federal agency proposed by President Richard Nixon and created in December 1970.

Related entries & more 
speciesism (n.)

"discrimination against certain animals based on assumption of human superiority," first attested 1975 in Richard D. Ryder's "Victims of Science," from species + -ism.

Related entries & more