Etymology
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rhetoric (n.)

early 14c., rethorike, "the art of eloquence and persuasiveness in language, the art of using language to influence others," from Old French retorike, rethorique (Modern French rhétorique) and directly from Latin rhetorice, from Greek rhētorikētekhnē  "art of an orator," from rhētōr (genitive rhētoros) "speaker, master speaker, orator; artist of discourse; teacher of rhetoric," especially (in the Attic official language), "orator in public." This is related to rhesis "speech," rhema "word, phrase, verb," literally "that which is spoken" (from PIE *wre-tor-, from root *were- (3) "to speak;" see verb). Since classical times with a derogatory suggestion of "artificial oratory" as opposed to what is natural or unaffected, "ostentatious declamation."

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rhetorician (n.)

early 15c., rethoricien, "writer on the art of rhetoric; professional orator; master of literary eloquence," from Old French rethoricien (Modern French rhétoricien), from rethorique (see rhetoric). An Old English word for one was wordsawere "word-sower."

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rhetor (n.)

late 14c., rethor, "master or teacher of rhetoric," also "an ancient Greek orator," from Old French retor (Modern French rhéteur), from Latin rhetor (in Medieval Latin also rethor), from Greek rhētōr "speaker, master speaker, orator; artist of discourse; teacher of rhetoric" (see rhetoric (n.)). 

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rhetorical (adj.)

mid-15c., rethorical, "eloquent, according to the principles of rhetoric," from rhetoric (n.) or else from Latin rhetoricus (in Medieval Latin rethoricus), from Greek rhētorikos "oratorical, rhetorical; skilled in speaking," from rhētōr "orator."

The meaning "pertaining to rhetoric" is from 1520s. In later use also with implication of artificial extravagance. Rhetorical question, "statement put in the form of a question for rhetorical effect only and thus not requiring an answer," is from 1670s. Related: Rhetorically.

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trope (n.)
1530s, from Latin tropus "a figure of speech," from Greek tropos "a turn, direction, course, way; manner, fashion," in rhetoric, "turn or figure of speech," related to trope "a turning" and trepein "to turn," from PIE root *trep- "to turn." Technically, in rhetoric, "a figure of speech which consists in the use of a word or phrase in a sense other than that which is proper to it" [OED], "as when we call a stupid fellow an ass, or a shrewd man a fox" [Century Dictionary].
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gemination (n.)

1590s, "a doubling," from Latin geminationem (nominative geminatio) "a doubling," noun of action from past-participle stem of geminare "to double, repeat" (see geminate). In rhetoric, repetition of a word or phrase for emphasis.

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hyperbolic (adj.)
1640s in rhetoric (iperbolical is from early 15c.), from Latin hyperbolic, from Greek hyperbolikos "extravagant," from hyperbole "extravagance," literally "a throwing beyond" (see hyperbole). Geometric sense is from 1670s, from hyperbola + -ic. Related: Hyperbolically.
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antithesis (n.)
1520s, "opposition, contrast," originally in rhetoric, "the bringing of contrary ideas or terms in close opposition;" 1530s as "that which is in (rhetorical) opposition or contrast," from Late Latin antithesis, from Greek antithesis "opposition, resistance," literally "a placing against," also a term in logic and rhetoric, noun of action from antitithenai "to set against, oppose," a term in logic, from anti "against" (see anti-) + tithenai "to put, place," from reduplicated form of PIE root *dhe- "to set, put."

The extended sense of "direct or striking opposition" is from 1630s; as "that which is the direct opposite" from 1831.
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hysteresis (n.)
"a lagging of one of two related phenomenon behind the other" [Century Dictionary], 1881, from Greek hysteresis "a coming short, a deficiency," from hysteros "later, second, after," from PIE *ud-tero-, from root *ud- "up, out" (see out (adv.)). Earlier as a term in rhetoric.
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antanaclasis (n.)
in rhetoric, "repetition of the same word in a different sense" ("While we live, let us live"), 1650s, from Latinized form of Greek antanaklasis "reflection of light or sound," literally "a bending back against," from anti "against" (see anti-) + anaklan "to bend back."
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