Etymology
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revolt (v.)

1540s, "cast off allegiance, rise against rulers, break away from established authority," from French revolter (15c.), which is from or cognate with Italian rivoltare "to overthrow, overturn," from Vulgar Latin *revolvitare "to overturn, overthrow," frequentative of Latin revolvere (past participle revolutus) "turn, roll back" (see revolve). Related: Revolted; revolting.

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revolt (n.)

"insurrection, rebellion, uprising against government or authority," 1550s, from French révolte (c. 1500), which is a back-formation from revolter (see revolt (v.)) or else from cognate Italian rivolta.

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revolting (adj.)

1590s, "rebellious, that revolts, given to revolt," present-participle adjective from revolt (v.). The sense of "repulsive" is from 1749 (implied in revoltingness), from the verb in a sense of "cause to turn away in abhorrence or disgust" (also "rise in repugnance" against, "turn in loathing" from), a sense developed by mid-18c. Related: Revoltingly.

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*wel- (3)
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to turn, revolve," with derivatives referring to curved, enclosing objects.

It forms all or part of: archivolt; circumvolve; convoluted; convolution; devolve; elytra; evolution; evolve; Helicon; helicopter; helix; helminth; lorimer; ileus; involve; revolt; revolution; revolve; valve; vault (v.1) "jump or leap over;" vault (n.1) "arched roof or ceiling;" volte-face; voluble; volume; voluminous; volute; volvox; volvulus; vulva; wale; walk; wallet; wallow; waltz; well (v.) "to spring, rise, gush;" welter; whelk; willow.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit valate "turns round," ulvam "womb, vulva;" Lithuanian valtis "twine, net," vilnis "wave," apvalus "round;" Old Church Slavonic valiti "roll, welter," vlŭna "wave;" Greek eluein "to roll round, wind, enwrap," eilein "twist, turn, squeeze; revolve, rotate," helix "spiral object;" Latin volvere "to turn, twist;" Gothic walwjan "to roll;" Old English wealwian "roll," weoloc "whelk, spiral-shelled mollusk;" Old High German walzan "to roll, waltz;" Old Irish fulumain "rolling;" Welsh olwyn "wheel."
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mutiny (n.)

"forcible resistance of or revolt against constituted authority on the part of subordinates," especially "a revolt of soldiers or seamen against their commanding officers," 1560s, with noun suffix -y (4) + obsolete verb mutine "revolt" (1540s), from French mutiner "to revolt," from meutin "rebellious," from meute "a revolt, movement," from Vulgar Latin *movita "a military uprising," from fem. past participle of Latin movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away"). The Mutiny on the Bounty took place in 1789.

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counterinsurgency (n.)

"military or other action taken to oppose a revolution or revolt," 1962, from counter- + insurgency.

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Intifada (n.)
"Palestinian revolt," 1985, from Arabic, literally "a jumping up" (in reaction to something), from the verb intafada "to be shaken, shake oneself."
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defection (n.)

1540s, "action of failing," especially in performance of duty or obligation; 1550s, "action of deserting or abandoning a party, leader, cause, etc." (in early use often of faith); from Latin defectionem (nominative defectio) "desertion, revolt, failure," noun of action from past-participle stem of deficere "to desert, revolt, fail," from de "down, away" (see de-) + combining form of facere "to do, make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

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mutiny (v.)

"to revolt against lawful authority, with or without armed resistance, especially in the army or navy," 1580s, from mutiny (n.). Alternative mutine is recorded from 1550s. Related: Mutinied; mutinying.

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uprising (n.)
mid-13c., "action of rising from death or the grave, resurrection," from up (adv.) + rising (n.). Meaning "action of rising from bed" is recorded from c. 1300; sense of "insurrection, popular revolt" first attested 1580s.
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