Etymology
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result (v.)

early 15c., resulten, "occur as a result, arise as a consequence of facts, arguments, etc.," from Latin resultare "to spring forward, rebound" (in Medieval Latin "to result"), a frequentative from the past participle of resilire "to rebound" (see resilience). The etymological sense is rare in English, mostly in poetry, now obsolete. Related: Resulted; resulting.

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result (n.)

1620s, "action of leaping or springing back" (a sense now obsolete); 1640s, "outcome, effect, consequence;" 1650s, "decision, outcome of an action or process;" from result (v.). Related: Results "favorable or desirable consequences" (by 1922). Mathematical sense of "quantity or value ascertained by a calculation" is by 1771.

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resultant (n.)

mid-15c., in mathematics, "the total or sum, the sum of an addition or product of a multiplication," from Medieval Latin resultantem (nominative resultans), present participle of resultare "to result" (see result (v.)). Sense in mechanics is from 1815.

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resultant (adj.)

"existing or following as a consequence, resulting," 1630s, from resultant (adj.) and from Medieval Latin resultantem (nominative resultans), present participle of resultare "to result" (see result (v.)).

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resilience (n.)
Origin and meaning of resilience

1620s, "act of rebounding or springing back," often of immaterial things, from Latin resiliens, present participle of resilire "to rebound, recoil," from re- "back" (see re-) + salire "to jump, leap" (see salient (adj.)). Compare result (v.). In physical sciences, the meaning "elasticity, power of returning to original shape after compression, etc." is by 1824.

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pressurization (n.)

"action or result of pressuring," 1937, from pressure (v.) + -ization.

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conclusion (n.)

late 14c., "deduction or inference reached by reasoning, result of a discussion or examination," from Old French conclusion "conclusion, result, outcome," from Latin conclusionem (nominative conclusio), noun of action from past-participle stem of concludere "to shut up, enclose" (see conclude).

Also, from late 14c. "the end, termination, final part; closing passages of a speech or writing; final result, outcome." For foregone conclusion, see forego.

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grouping (n.)

"act, process, or result of arranging in a group," 1748, verbal noun from group (v.).

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despatch 

18c. variant of dispatch (q.v.), apparently the result of an error in the printing of Johnson's dictionary.

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