Etymology
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repose (v.1)

"lie or be at rest," mid-15c., reposen, "rest (oneself)," from Old French reposer, earlier repauser (10c.), from Late Latin repausare "cause to rest," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + pausare "to stop" (see pause (v.)). Related: Reposed; reposing.

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repose (v.2)

"to put, place," mid-15c., reposen, "to put (something) back;" perhaps from re- "back, again" + pose (v.) or so formed in Middle English from Old French poser, on model of disposen "dispose" [Klein], or else from Latin repos-, infinitive stem of reponere "put back, set back, replace, restore; put away, lay out, stretch out," from re- + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Related: Reposed; reposing.

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repose (n.)

c. 1500, "act or state of rest from activity, temporary inaction, sleep," from Old French repos (11c.), a back-formation from reposer (see repose (v.1)). Meaning "state of quiet, freedom from disturbing influences" is by 1650s. As a noun, 17c. also used reposal, reposance.

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reposeful (adj.)

"full of repose," 1670s, from repose (n.) + -ful. Earlier it meant "responsible, trustworthy" (1620s), from repose (v.2). Related: Reposefulness.

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repository (n.)

late 15c. (Caxton), "vessel, etc., for storage," from French repositoire or directly from Late Latin repositorium "store," in classical Latin, "a stand on which food is placed," from noun use of repositus, past participle of reponere "put away, store" (see repose (v.2)).

The figurative sense of "place where anything immaterial is thought of as stored" is recorded from 1640s; commercial sense of "place where things are kept for sale" is by 1759.

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reposition (n.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), reposicioun, in medicine, "a placing, putting, act of replacing, operation of restoring (something) to its original position," from Late Latin repositionem (nominative repositio) "a laying up, a storing up," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin reponere (see repose (v.2)). Meaning "act of laying up in safety" is from 1610s; that of "reinstatement" (of a person, to an office, etc.)
is from 1640s.

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compose (v.)

c. 1400, compousen, "to write" (a book), from Old French composer "put together, compound; adjust, arrange; write" a work (12c.), from com- "with, together" (see com-) + poser "to place," from Late Latin pausare "to cease, lay down" (see pause (n.)).

Meaning influenced in Old French by componere "to arrange, direct" (see composite; also see compound (v.), pose (v.)), which gradually was replaced in French by composer. Similar confusion is found in expose, oppose, repose (v.2), transpose, etc.

Meaning "to make or form by uniting two or more things" is from late 15c. Sense of "be the substance or elements of, make up" is from 1540s. Sense of "invent and put (music) into proper form" is from 1590s. From c. 1600 as "bring into a composed state, to cal, quiet;" from 1650s as "place (parts or elements) in proper form, arrange."

In painting, "combine into an arrangement with artistic effect" (1782). In printing, "put into type" (1630s), but the usual term among printers was set. Related: Composed; composing. The printers' composing room is from 1737.

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quiet (n.)

c. 1300, "freedom from disturbance or conflict; calm, stillness," from Old French quiete "rest, repose, tranquility" and directly from Latin quies (genitive quietis) "a lying still, rest, repose, peace" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet").

From late 14c. as "inactivity, rest, repose;" from c. 1400 as "absence of noise."

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requiem (n.)

"mass for repose of the soul of the dead," c. 1300, from Latin requiem, accusative singular of requies "rest (after labor), repose," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + quies "quiet" (from suffixed form of PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet"). It is the first word of the Mass for the Dead in the Latin liturgy: Requiem æternam dona eis, Domine .... ["Rest eternal grant them, O Lord ...."]. By 1610s as "any dirge or solemn chant for repose of the dead."

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bedchamber (n.)
also bed-chamber, "a room for sleep or repose," mid-14c., from bed (n.) + chamber (n.). Now mostly archaic and replaced by bedroom.
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