Etymology
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report (n.)

late 14c., "an account brought by one person to another; rumor, gossip," from Old French report "pronouncement, judgment" (Modern French rapport), from reporter "to tell, relate" (see report (v.)).

By early 15c. as "informative statement by a reputable source, authoritative account." In law, "formal account of a case argued and determined in court," by 1610s. The meaning "formal statement of results of an investigation" is attested by 1660s; sense of "teacher's official statement of a pupil's work and behavior" is from 1873 (report card in the school sense is attested by 1913, American English). The meaning "resounding noise, sound of an explosion or of the discharge of a firearm" is from 1580s.  

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report (v.)

late 14c., "to make known, tell, relate," from Old French reporter "to tell, relate; bring back, carry away, hand over," from Latin reportare "carry back, bear back, bring back," figuratively "report," in Medieval Latin "write (an account) for information or record," from re- "back" (see re-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). Early 15c. as "to submit" (to an authority, etc.). Meaning "to name someone as having offended somehow" is from 1885.

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reported (adj.)

"according to report," 1812, past-participle adjective from report (v.). Related: Reportedly.

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reportage (n.)

"the describing of events," 1877, from French; see report (v.) + -age.

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misreport (v.)

"report incorrectly, give a false report," c. 1400, from mis- (1) + report (v.). Related: Misreported; misreporting.

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reporting (n.)

mid-15c., "a written document," verbal noun from report (v.). By 1861 as "newspaper work involving gathering information and writing accounts for publication."

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reportable (adj.)

1842, "capable of being reported, coherent, detailed;" 1851, "worthy of being reported" (originally of court cases), from report (v.) + -able. Of accidents, etc., "proper to be reported to the authorities," by 1942. Related: Reportably.

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rapporteur (n.)

"person who prepares an account of the proceedings of a committee, etc., for a higher body," 1791, from French rapporteur "tell-tale, gossip; reporter," from rapporter "bring back; refer to," Old French reporter (see report (v.)). The word was earlier in English in the now-obsolete sense of "a reporter" (c. 1500).

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rapport (n.)

1660s, "reference, relation, relationship," from French rapport "bearing, yield, produce; harmony, agreement, intercourse," back-formation from rapporter "bring back; refer to," from re- "again" (see re-) + apporter "to bring," from Latin apportare "to bring," from ad "to" (see ad-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). The Old French noun was report "pronouncement, judgment," from reporter "to tell, relate" (see report (v.)).

Especially "harmonious relation; accord or agreement; analogy." Psychological meaning "intense harmonious accord," as between therapist and patient, is first attested 1894, though the word had been used in a similar sense with reference to mesmerism from 1845 (in Poe). Also see report (n.).

Formerly often used as a French word, and in en rapport. Johnson [1755] frowns on the word and credits its use in English to Sir William Temple, notorious naturalizer of French terms, who did use it but was not the first to do so. Fowler writes that it was "formerly common enough to be regarded and pronounced as English," but in his time [1926] the word seemed to have reacquired its Frenchness and was thus dispensable.

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reporter (n.)

c. 1400, reportour, "one who gives an account" of what was said or done by another (common 16c.-17c. in this general sense; often pejorative, "a tale-bearer"), agent noun from report (v.), or from Old French reporteur (Modern French rapporteur).

From 1610s as "one who takes down reports of law cases." In the journalistic sense, "member of the staff of a newspaper whose work is to collect information and submit it to the editors in the form they prescribe," from 1798 (from 1797 as the name of a newspaper). French reporter in this sense is a 19c. borrowing from English.

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