Etymology
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renege (v.)

1540s, renegue, "deny, renounce, abandon" (archaic), from Medieval Latin renegare, from Latin re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see re-), + negare "to refuse" (from PIE root *ne- "not").

The meaning "change one's mind, go back on (one's word or promise)" is by 1784. OED identifies this as "orig. and chiefly U.S.," and adds that it is "Now the dominant sense," in the spelling renege. Three of its first four examples of it in this sense spell it renig, renigged. Related: Reneged; reneging.

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on- 

the preposition and adverb on used as a prefix; Old English on-, an-.

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-on 
subatomic particle suffix, from ion.
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on (prep., adv.)

"in a position above and in contact with; in such a position as to be supported by;" also noting the goal to which some action is or has been directed; "about, concerning, regarding; in a position to cover;" as an adverb, "in or into a position in contact with and supported by the top or upper part of something; in or into place; in place for use or action; into movement or action; in operation," Old English on, unstressed variant of an "in, on, into," from Proto-Germanic *ana "on" (source also of Dutch aan, German an, Gothic ana "on, upon"), from PIE root *an- (1) "on" (source also of Avestan ana "on," Greek ana "on, upon," Latin an-, Old Church Slavonic na, Lithuanian nuo "down from").

Also used in Old English in many places where we now would use in. From 16c.-18c. (and still in northern England dialect) often reduced to o'. Phrase on to "aware" is from 1877.

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clip-on (adj.)

"held on by means of a clip," 1909, from the verbal phrase; see clip (v.2) + on (adv.).

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hang on (v.)
1860, "to remain clinging," 1860, especially "cling fondly to" (1871); see hang (v.) + on (adv.). As a command to be patient, wait a minute, from 1936, originally in telephone conversations.
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hard-on (n.)
"penile erection," 1922, earlier as an adjective (1893), from hard + on.
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add-on (n.)
"additional component," 1941, from verbal phrase add on; see add (v.) + on (adv.).
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walk-on (n.)
"minor non-speaking role," 1902, theatrical slang, from the verbal phrase walk on, attested in theater jargon by 1897 with a sense "appear in crowd scenes," from walk (v.) + on (adv.). Meaning "actor who has such a part" is attested from 1946. The sports team sense is recorded from 1974.
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