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disorder (v.)

late 15c. (Caxton), "destroy or derange the order of, throw into confusion," from dis- "not" (see dis-) + order (v.). Replaced earlier disordeine (mid-14c.), from Old French desordainer, from Medieval Latin disordinare "throw into disorder," from Latin dis- + ordinare "to order, regulate," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Disordered; disordering.

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renal (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the kidneys," 1650s, from French rénal and directly from Late Latin renalis "of or belonging to kidneys," from Latin ren (plural renes) "kidneys," a word of of uncertain etymology, with possible cognates in Old Irish aru "kidney, gland," Welsh arenn "kidney, testicle," Hittite hah(ha)ari "lung(s), midriff." Also possibly related are Old Prussian straunay, Lithuanian strėnos "loins," Latvian streina "loins." "The semantic shift from 'loins' to 'kidneys' is quite conceivable" [de Vaan].

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disorder (n.)

1520s, "lack of regular arrangement;" 1530s, "tumult, disturbance of the peace;" from disorder (v.). Meaning "an ailment, a disturbance of the body or mind" is by 1704.

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attention deficit disorder (n.)
(abbreviated ADD), introduced as a diagnosis in the third edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (1980), from attention in the "power of mental concentration" sense. Expanded to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ("the co-existence of attentional problems and hyperactivity, with each behavior occurring infrequently alone;" ADHD) in DSM-III (1987).
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adrenal (adj.)
"of or near the kidneys," 1866, Modern Latin, from ad- + renalis "of the kidneys," from Latin renes "kidneys" (see renal). Adrenal gland is from 1875.
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renin (n.)
enzyme found in kidneys, 1894, from German Renin, from Latin renes "kidneys" (see renal) + -in (2).
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reniform (adj.)

in science, "having the form or shape of a (human) kidney," 1753, from Latin renes "kidneys" (see renal) + -form.

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nephridium (n.)

(plural nephridia), "sexual or renal organ of mollusks," 1848, Modern Latin, from Greek diminutive of nephros "kidney" (see nephro-).

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shambolic (adj.)
1961, apparently from shamble in the sense "disorder" (see shambles), perhaps on model of symbolic.
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muss (v.)

"to make untidy, put in a state of disorder," 1837, American English, probably a variant of mess in its sense of "to disorder." It was attested earlier (1830) as a noun meaning "disturbance, state of confusion." Related: Mussed; mussing.

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