Etymology
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relate (v.)

1520s, "to recount, tell," from French relater "refer, report" (14c.) and directly from Latin relatus, used as past participle of referre "bring back, bear back" (see refer), from re- "back, again" + lātus "borne, carried" (see oblate (n.)).

The meaning "stand in some relation; have reference or respect" is from 1640s; transitive sense of "bring (something) into relation with (something else)" is from 1690s. Meaning "to establish a relation between" is from 1771. Sense of "to feel connected or sympathetic to" is attested from 1950, originally in psychology jargon. Related: Related; relating.

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relatable (adj.)

1825, "narrated," from relate (v.) + -able. Related: Relatably; relatability.

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unrelated (adj.)

1660s, "not akin," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of relate (v.). Meaning "not in any relationship" is attested from 1660s; that of "not told" is from 1764.

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related (adj.)

c. 1600, "recited, narrated;" 1702, "connected by blood or marriage," past-participle adjective from relate (v.) in various senses. Related: Relatedness.

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relator (n.)

"informer," with a specialized sense in law, c. 1600, from Latin relator, agent noun; see relate. Related: Relatrix.

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interrelate (v.)

also inter-relate, 1831 (implied in interrelated), transitive, "bring into reciprocal relation," from inter- "between" + relate (v.). Intransitive sense "come into reciprocal relation" is attested from 1912. Related: Interrelating.

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relation (n.)

c. 1300, relacioun, "relationship, connection, correspondence;" late 14c. as "act of telling or relating in words," from Anglo-French relacioun, Old French relacion "report, connection" (14c.) and directly from Latin relationem (nominative relatio) "a bringing back, restoring; a report, proposition," from relatus (see relate).

The meaning "person related by blood or marriage" is attested from c. 1500. The phrase no relation "not in the same family," used in differentiating persons with the same surname, is attested by 1930.

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recount (v.1)

"to tell, relate in detail," late 15c., also recompt, from Old North French and Anglo-French reconter (12c., Modern French raconter), from Old French re- "again" (see re-) + conter "to relate, reckon" (see count (v.)). Frequent in Caxton. Related: Recounted; recounting.

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narrate (v.)

"tell or recite in detail, relate the particulars or incidents of," 1748, a back-formation from narration or else from Latin narratus, past participle of narrare "to tell, relate, recount," from PIE root *gno- "to know." "Richardson and Johnson call it Scottish" [OED], a stigma which kept it from general use until 19c. A few mid-17c. instances are traceable to Spanish narrar. Related: Narrated; narrating.

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narrable (adj.)

"capable of being related or told," 1620s, from Latin narrabilis, from narrare "to tell, relate" (see narration). Alternative narratable is recorded by 1847.

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