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rejection (n.)

"act of throwing off or away; refusal to accept or grant," 1550s, from French réjection (16c.) or directly from Latin reiectionem (nominative reiectio) "act of throwing back," noun of action from past-participle stem of reicere (see reject (v.)).

In 19c., it also could mean "excrement." An earlier use was "setting aside of a wife, divorce" (mid-15c.). Medical transplant sense is from 1954. In the psychological sense, relating to parenting, from 1931.

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*ye- 

*yē-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to throw, impel."

It forms all or part of: abject; abjection; adjacence; adjacent; adjective; aphetic; catheter; circumjacent; conjecture; deject; ease; ejaculate; eject; enema; gist; ictus; interjacent; inject; interject; interjection; jess; jet (v.1) "to sprout or spurt forth, shoot out;" jet (n.1) "stream of water;" jete; jetsam; jettison; jetton; jetty (n.) "pier;" joist; jut; object; objection; objective; paresis; project; projectile; reject; rejection; subjacent; subject; subjective; trajectory.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Hittite ijami "I make;" Latin iacere "to throw, cast."

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pshaw (interj.)

exclamation of contempt, disdain, impatience, rejection, by 1670s.

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reprobation (n.)

c. 1400, reprobacioun, "rejection," from Church Latin reprobationem (nominative reprobatio) "rejection, reprobation," noun of action from past-participle stem of reprobare "disapprove, reject, condemn" (see reprobate (adj.)).

In theology, "the state of being consigned to eternal punishment" (1530s). From 1580s as "condemnation as worthless or spurious;" the broad sense of "condemnation, censure, act of vehemently disapproving" is from 1727. Other nouns that have been used in English include reprobacy (1590s), reprobance (c. 1600), reprobature (1680s, legal).

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disavowal (n.)

"denial, rejection, repudiation, action of refusing to acknowledge," 1748; see disavow + -al (2). An earlier word was disavowment (1630s).

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post-Christian (adj.)

by 1807 as "after the lifetime of Christ," from post- + Christ + -ian; by 1929 as "after the decline or rejection of Christianity," from Christian.

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reproof (n.)

mid-14c., "a shame, a disgrace" (a sense now obsolete), also "a censure to one's face, a rebuke addressed to a person," from Old French reprove "reproach, rejection," verbal noun from reprover "to blame, accuse" (see reprove).

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phooey 

expression of contempt, 1921 (in a newspaper cartoon), from Yiddish, from German pfui (attested in English from 1866); popularized by Walter Winchell. Phoo "vocalic gesture expressing contemptuous rejection" is recorded from 1640s. And compare go phut "come to nothing, come to a sudden end" (1906).

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Euclidean (adj.)
1650s, "of or pertaining to Euclid" (Greek Eukleides), c. 300 B.C.E. geometer of Alexandria. Now often used in contrast to alternative models based on rejection of some of his axioms. His name in Greek means "renowned, glorious," from eu "well" (see eu-) + kleos "fame" (see Clio).
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refusal (n.)

late 15c., refusel, "act of refusing to do something, rejection of anything demanded," from refuse (v.) + -al (2). The sense of "choice of refusing or taking," as in right of first refusal, is by 1570s. The earlier noun was simply refuse (late 14c., from Old French refus), which was common through 16c.

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