Etymology
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reject (v.)

early 15c., rejecten, "eject, set aside, block from inheritance;" late 15c., "refuse to acquiesce or submit to," from Old French rejecter and directly from Latin reiectus, past participle of reiectare "throw away, cast away, vomit," frequentative of reicere "to throw back," from re- "back" (see re-) + -icere, combining form of iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel").

The meaning "throw away as undesirable or useless, refuse to take for some purpose" is by 1530s. From 1560s as "to repel or rebuff (someone who makes advances of any kind)," especially of a woman refusing a man as a lover or husband (1580s). The sense of "refuse (something offered)" is by 1660s. The medical sense of "show immune response to a transplanted organ" is from 1953. Related: Rejected; rejecting.

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reject (n.)

mid-15c., "refusal, denial;" 1550s, "a castaway" (both now obsolete), from reject (v.) or obsolete reject (adj.). The sense of "thing cast aside as unsatisfactory" (1893) probably is a fresh extension. Hence "person considered low-quality and worthless" (1925, from use in the militaries in reference to men unsuitable for service).

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rejection (n.)

"act of throwing off or away; refusal to accept or grant," 1550s, from French réjection (16c.) or directly from Latin reiectionem (nominative reiectio) "act of throwing back," noun of action from past-participle stem of reicere (see reject (v.)).

In 19c., it also could mean "excrement." An earlier use was "setting aside of a wife, divorce" (mid-15c.). Medical transplant sense is from 1954. In the psychological sense, relating to parenting, from 1931.

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*ye- 

*yē-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to throw, impel."

It forms all or part of: abject; abjection; adjacence; adjacent; adjective; aphetic; catheter; circumjacent; conjecture; deject; ease; ejaculate; eject; enema; gist; ictus; interjacent; inject; interject; interjection; jess; jet (v.1) "to sprout or spurt forth, shoot out;" jet (n.1) "stream of water;" jete; jetsam; jettison; jetton; jetty (n.) "pier;" joist; jut; object; objection; objective; paresis; project; projectile; reject; rejection; subjacent; subject; subjective; trajectory.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Hittite ijami "I make;" Latin iacere "to throw, cast."

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negative (v.)

"reject, refuse to accept," 1706, from negative (adj.).

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reprobate (v.)

early 15c., reprobaten, "condemn, disapprove vehemently," from Late Latin reprobatus, past participle of reprobare "disapprove, reject, condemn" (see reprobate (adj.)). Later coming to mean "reject, put away, set aside" (by c. 1600). Related: Reprobated; reprobating.

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disbelieve (v.)

"not to believe or credit, reject the truth or reality of," 1640s; see dis- + believe. Related: Disbelieved; disbelieving; disbeliever.

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recuse (v.)

late 14c., recusen, "to decline, refuse," especially "reject another's authority or jurisdiction over oneself as prejudiced," from Old French recuser (13c.) and directly from Latin recusare "make an objection against; decline, refuse, reject; be reluctant to," from re- (see re-) + causa (see cause (n.)). Specifically, in law, "reject or challenge (a judge or juror) as disqualified to act." The word now is used mostly reflectively. Related: Recused; recusing; recisative.

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dismissive (adj.)

1640s, "characterized by or appropriate to dismissal;" from dismiss + -ive. Meaning "contemptuous, tending to reject as insignificant" is recorded by 1922 (implied in dismissively). Related: Dismissiveness.

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spurn (v.)
Old English spurnan "to kick (away), strike against; reject, scorn, despise," from Proto-Germanic *spurnon (source also of Old Saxon and Old High German spurnan, Old Frisian spurna, Old Norse sporna "to kick, drive away with the feet"), from PIE root *spere- "ankle" (source also of Middle Dutch spoor "track of an animal," Greek sphyron "ankle," Latin spernere "to reject, spurn," Sanskrit sphurati "kicks," Middle Irish seir "heel"). Related: Spurned; spurning.
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