Etymology
Advertisement
regulation (n.)

1670s, "act of regulating; state of being reduced to order," noun of action from regulate. Meaning "a rule for management prescribed by a superior or competent authority" is from 1715. As an adjective, "having a fixed pattern; in accord with a rule or standard," by 1836. Related: Regulations.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
reg (n.)

by 1952 as a shortening of regulation (n.). Related: Regs.

Related entries & more 
dietetics (n.)

"branch of medicine which relates to regulation of food and drink consumed," 1540s, see dietetic + -ics.

Related entries & more 
self-regulating (adj.)

"regulating itself," 1837, from self- + present participle of regulate (v.). Related: Self-regulated; self-regulation.

Related entries & more 
adjustment (n.)

"a making fit or conformable; the act of adapting to a given purpose; orderly regulation or arrangement," 1640s, from French ajustement (Old French ajostement) or else a native formation from adjust (v.) + -ment.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
variance (n.)
late 14c., "fact of undergoing change," from Old French variance "change, alteration; doubt, hesitation" and directly from Latin variantia, from stem of variare "to change" (see vary). Meaning "state of disagreement" is recorded from early 15c. The U.S. zoning sense of "official dispensation from a building regulation" is recorded from 1925.
Related entries & more 
paternalism (n.)

1851, "feeling of a father for his children," from paternal + -ism. By 1866 "government as by a father over his children, undue solicitude on the part of the central government for the protection of the people," specifically "excessive governmental regulation of the private affairs and business methods of the people." Related: Paternalistic (1890).

Related entries & more 
regimen (n.)

c. 1400, medical, "course of diet, exercise, etc. for sake of health; regulation of such matters as influence health," mid-15c., "act of governing," from Old French regimen (14c.) and directly from Latin regimen "rule, guidance, government, means of guidance, rudder," from regere "to rule, to direct, keep straight, guide" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line," thus "to lead, rule").

By 1751 in the transferred sense of "any regulation or remedy intended to produce gradual, beneficial effects." Regimen, regime, and, later, regiment (n.), all from the same Latin verb, were not always clearly distinguished in English, and as recently as late 19c. each of the first two was used even by careful writers in senses now restricted to the other. 

Related entries & more 
control (n.)

1580s, "act of keeping under authority and regulation, fact of checking and directing action," from control (v.). Meaning "a check, restraint" is from 1590s. Meaning "a standard of comparison in scientific experiments" is by 1857, probably from German Controleversuche. Airport control tower is from 1920; control-room is from 1897. Control freak "person who feels an obsessive need to have command of any situation" is by 1969.

Related entries & more 
decree (n.)

"special ordinance or regulation promulgated by authority," early 14c., originally ecclesiastical, secular use is by late 14c., from Old French decre, variant of decret (12c., Modern French décret), from Latin decretum, neuter of decretus, past participle of decernere "to decree, decide, pronounce a decision," from de (see de-) + cernere "to separate" (from PIE root *krei- "to sieve," thus "discriminate, distinguish").

Related entries & more