Etymology
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refinement (n.)

1610s, "act or process of refining; state of being pure or purified," from refine + -ment. Meaning "fineness of feeling, state of being free from what is coarse or debasing" is from 1710; that of "that which proceeds from refinement or the desire to be refined, an improvement of language, taste, etc., or an alteration in them for the better" is from 1670s (Dryden). Related: Refinements.

Refinement is properly most negative, representing a freeing from what is gross, coarse, rude, and the like, or a bringing of one out of a similar condition in which he is supposed to have been at the start. Cultivation and culture represent the person or the better part of him as made to grow by long-continued and thorough work. [Century Dictionary, 1900]
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elegance (n.)

c. 1500, "tastefulness, correctness, harmoniousness, refinement," of speech or prose, from Latin elegantia "taste, propriety, refinement," from elegantem (see elegant). Earlier form was elegancy (early 15c.). Meaning "refined luxury" is from 1797. Via French come German Eleganz, Swedish elegans, etc.

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inelegance (n.)
1690s, from French inélégance (16c.) or directly from Late Latin inelegantia, from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Latin elegantia "taste, propriety, refinement" (see elegance).
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homeliness (n.)
mid-14c., "meekness, gentleness," also "familiarity, intimacy; friendliness," from homely + -ness. Sense degenerated by c. 1400 to "want of refinement in manners, coarseness; presumptuousness." Meaning "lack of beauty" is by 1849.
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urbanity (n.)

1530s, from French urbanité (14c.) and directly from Latin urbanitatem (nominative urbanitas) "city life; life in Rome; refinement, city fashion or manners, elegance, courtesy," also "wit, raillery, trickery," from urbanus (see urban).

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sublimation (n.)
late 14c., in alchemy, "process of purifying by vaporizing then allowing to cool," from Medieval Latin sublimationem (nominative sublimatio) "refinement," literally "a lifting up, deliverance," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin sublimare "to raise, elevate," from sublimis "lofty, high, exalted; eminent, distinguished" (see sublime).
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rusticity (n.)

1530s, "lack of breeding or refinement, awkwardness," from French rusticite (15c.), from Latin rusticitatem (nominative rusticitas) "country life," from rusticus (see rustic (adj.)). By 1630s as "rural life, quality, or character; anything betokening a rustic life or origin."

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Augustan (adj.)
1640s, from Latin Augustanus, "pertaining to Augustus (Caesar)," whose reign (31 B.C.E.-14 C.E.) was connected with "the palmy period of Latin literature" [OED]; hence, "period of purity and refinement in any national literature" (1712); in French, the reign of Louis XIV; in English, that of Queen Anne.
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no-frills (adj.)

1957, from no + frills. The expression no thrills meaning "without extra flourishes or ornamentation" is in use from 1870s; the original notion probably is of plain clothing.

Man with no frills (American) a plain person, a man without culture or refinement. An amiable term to express a vulgar fellow. [Albert Barrère and Charles G. Leland, "A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant," Ballantyne Press, 1890]
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humanity (n.)
late 14c., "kindness, graciousness, politeness; consideration for others," from Old French humanité, umanité "human nature; humankind, life on earth; pity," from Latin humanitatem (nominative humanitas) "human nature; the human race, mankind;" also "humane conduct, philanthropy, kindness; good breeding, refinement," from humanus (see human (adj.)). Sense of "human nature, human form, state or quality of being human" is c. 1400; that of "human race, humans collectively" first recorded mid-15c.
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