Etymology
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No results were found for redeposition. Showing results for reposition.
reposition (v.)

also re-position, 1859, "to put (something) in a new or adjusted position," from re- "again" + position (v.). Intransitive sense of "adjust or alter one's position" is by 1947. Related: Repositioned; repositioning.

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reposition (n.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), reposicioun, in medicine, "a placing, putting, act of replacing, operation of restoring (something) to its original position," from Late Latin repositionem (nominative repositio) "a laying up, a storing up," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin reponere (see repose (v.2)). Meaning "act of laying up in safety" is from 1610s; that of "reinstatement" (of a person, to an office, etc.)
is from 1640s.

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traction (n.)

early 15c., "a drawing or pulling" (originally the pulling of a dislocated limb to reposition it), from Medieval Latin tractionem (nominative tractio) "a drawing" (mid-13c.), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)). Sense of "friction between a wheel and the surface it moves upon" first appears 1825. In modern medical care, "a sustained pull to a part of the body to hold fractured bones in position," 1885.

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