Etymology
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reconcile (v.)

mid-14c., reconcilen, transitive, in reference to persons, "to restore to union and friendship after estrangement or variance," also of God or Christ, "restore (mankind, sinners) to favor or grace," from Old French reconcilier (12c.) and directly from Latin reconcilare "to bring together again; regain; win over again, conciliate," from re- "again" (see re-) + conciliare "make friendly" (see conciliate).

Reflexive sense of "become reconciled, reconcile oneself" is from late 14c. Meaning "to make (discordant facts or statements) consistent, rid of apparent discrepancies" is from 1550s. Mental sense of "make (actions, facts, conditions, etc.) consistent with each other in one's mind" is from 1620s. Sense of "bring into acquiescence or quiet submission" (with to) is from c. 1600. Related: Reconciled; reconciling.

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reconcilable (adj.)

"capable of being reconciled," 1610s of statements; 1620s of persons; from reconcile + -able.

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unreconciled (adj.)
mid-15c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of reconcile (v.).
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reconciliation (n.)

mid-14c., reconciliacioun, "renewal of friendship after disagreement or enmity, action of reaching accord with an adversary or one estranged" (originally especially of God and sinners), from Old French reconciliacion (14c.) and directly from Latin reconciliationem (nominative reconciliatio) "a re-establishing, a reconciling," noun of action from past-participle stem of reconciliare (see reconcile).

From 1729 as "act of harmonizing or making consistent." Other early noun forms included reconcilement (mid-15c.), reconciling (late 14c.).

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*kele- (2)
*kelə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shout." Perhaps imitative.

It forms all or part of: acclaim; acclamation; Aufklarung; calendar; chiaroscuro; claim; Claire; clairvoyance; clairvoyant; clamor; Clara; claret; clarify; clarinet; clarion; clarity; class; clear; cledonism; conciliate; conciliation; council; declaim; declare; disclaim; ecclesiastic; eclair; exclaim; glair; hale (v.); halyard; intercalate; haul; keelhaul; low (v.); nomenclature; paraclete; proclaim; reclaim; reconcile.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit usakala "cock," literally "dawn-calling;" Latin calare "to announce solemnly, call out," clamare "to cry out, shout, proclaim;" Middle Irish cailech "cock;" Greek kalein "to call," kelados "noise," kledon "report, fame;" Old High German halan "to call;" Old English hlowan "to low, make a noise like a cow;" Lithuanian kalba "language."
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hilarity (n.)

mid-15c., from Latin hilaritatem (nominative hilaritas) "cheerfulness, gaiety, merriment," from hilaris "cheerful, merry," from Greek hilaros "cheerful, merry, joyous," related to hilaos "graceful, kindly," hilaskomai "to propitiate, appease, reconcile,"and probably from a suffixed form of a PIE root *selh- "reconcile" (source also of Latin solari "to comfort").

In ancient Rome, Hilaria (neuter plural of hilaris) were a class of holidays, times of pomp and rejoicing; there were public ones in honor of Cybele at the spring equinoxes as well as private ones on the day of a marriage or a son's birth.

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concord (v.)

late 14c., "reconcile, bring into harmony" (transitive); c. 1400, "agree, cooperate," from Old French concorder and directly from Latin concordare "be of one mind," from concors "of the same mind" (see concord (n.)). Related: Concorded; concording.

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settle (v.)
"come to rest," Old English setlan "cause to sit, place, put," from setl "a seat" (see settle (n.)). Related: Settling. Compare German siedeln "to settle, colonize."

From c. 1300 of birds, etc., "to alight." From early 14c. as "sink down, descend; cave in." Early 15c. in reference to suspended particles in a liquid. Sense of "establish a permanent residence" first recorded 1620s; that of "decide" is 1620s. Meaning "secure title to by deed" is from 1660s.

Meaning "reconcile" (a quarrel, differences, etc.) perhaps is influenced by Middle English sahtlen "to reconcile," from Old English saht "reconciliation," from Old Norse satt "reconciliation." To settle down "become content" is from 1853; transitive sense from 1520s; as what married couples do in establishing domesticity, from 1718. To settle for "content oneself with" is from 1943.
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solace (n.)

"comfort in grief, consolation," late 13c., from Old French solaz "pleasure, entertainment, enjoyment; solace, comfort," from Latin solacium "a soothing, assuaging; comfort, consolation," from solatus, past participle of solari "to console, soothe," from a suffixed form of PIE root *selh- "to reconcile" (source also of Greek hilaros). Adjectival form solacious is attested 16c.-17c.

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accord (n.)
Origin and meaning of accord
late 13c., "agreement, harmony of opinions," accourd, acord, from Old French acorde, acort "agreement, alliance," a back-formation from acorder "reconcile, agree, be in harmony" (see accord (v.)). Meaning "will, voluntary impulse or act" (as in of one's own accord) is from mid-15c.
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