Etymology
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receive (v.)

c. 1300, receiven, "take into one's possession, accept possession of," also in reference to the sacrament, from Old North French receivre (Old French recoivre) "seize, take hold of, pick up; welcome, accept," from Latin recipere "regain, take back, bring back, carry back, recover; take to oneself, take in, admit," from re- "back," though the exact sense here is obscure (see re-) + -cipere, combining form of capere "to take" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp").

From c. 1300 as "welcome (in a specified manner)." From early 14c. as "catch in the manner of a receptacle." From mid-14c. as "obtain as one's reward." From late 14c. as "accept as authoritative or true;" also late 14c. as "have a blow or wound inflicted." Radio and (later) television sense is attested from 1908. Related: Received; receiving. Receiving line is by 1933.

Other obsolete English verbs from the same Latin word in different forms included recept "to receive, take in" (early 15c., recepten, from Old French recepter, variant of receter and Latin receptus). Also compare receipt, which also had a verb form in Middle English, receiten.

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received (adj.)

"generally accepted as true or good," mid-15c., receyvyd, past-participle adjective from receive. Of opinions from c. 1600; of ideas (idée reçue), 1959. Thomas Browne called such notions receptaries (1646).

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receptive (adj.)

early 15c., "having the quality of receiving, acting as a receptacle," from Medieval Latin receptivus, from Latin recipere "to hold, contain" (see receive). Meaning "affecting or relating to the comprehension of speech or writing" is from 1926. Related: Receptively; receptiveness; receptivity.

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receptacle (n.)

"place for receiving or containing something," late 14c., from Old French receptacle (14c.) and directly from Latin receptaculum "place to receive and store things," from receptare, frequentative of recipere "to hold, contain" (see receive). As an adjectival form, receptacular (1847) has been used.

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recuperate (v.)

1540s, "recover, regain," from Latin recuperatus, past participle of recuperare "to get again," in Medieval Latin "revive, convalesce, recover," which is related to recipere  "to hold, contain" (see receive). Specific sense of "recover from exhaustion or sickness" is from 1864. Related: Recuperated; recuperating.

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receivable (adj.)

"able to be received" in any sense; "capable of reception," late 14c., from receive + -able, and in part from Anglo-French or Old French recevable, from Old French recoivre. Related: Receivableness; receivability. Receivables (n.) "debts owed to a business" is by 1863.

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recuperation (n.)

late 15c., "recovery or regaining of things, recovery as of something lost" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin recuperationem (nominative recuperatio) "a getting back, regaining, recovery," noun of action from past-participle stem of recuperare "get back, regain, get again," in Medieval Latin "revive, convalesce, recover," which is related to or a variant of recipere  "to hold, contain" (see receive). Meaning "restoration to health or vigor" is from 1865.

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receptor (n.)

mid-15c. (late 13c., Anglo-French), receptour, "a knowing harborer of criminals, heretics, etc.," from Old French receptour or directly from Latin receptor, agent noun from recipere  "to hold, contain" (see receive). Molecular biology sense is from 1900. Compare receiver. A receptory (early 15c., from Medieval Latin) was, among other definitions, an alchemical flask for receiving distillates.

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recipient (n.)

"a receiver or taker," especially "one who receives or accepts something given," 1550s, from French récipient (16c.) and directly from Latin recipientem (nominative recipiens), present participle of recipere  "to hold, contain" (see receive). As an adjective in English, "receiving, receptive, acting or capable of serving as a receiver," from 1610s. Related: Recipience "a receiving, the act of or capacity for receiving" (1882); recipiency (1822).

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receiver (n.)

mid-14c., receivour (mid-13c. as a surname, probably in the "government clerk" sense), "a recipient; a receiver (of stolen goods); person who knowingly harbors criminals," also "government official appointed to collect or receive money due," agent noun from receive, or from Old French recevere (Modern French receveur), agent noun from recievere.

From late 14c. as "receptacle, container." As a telephone apparatus, from 1877; in reference to a radio unit, from 1891; in U.S. football sense, from 1897. Middle English also has receitour in the sense "receiver of stolen goods" (late 14c.); also compare receptor.

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