Etymology
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recall (n.)

1610s, "a calling back, a summons to return;" 1650s, "a calling back to the mind," from recall (v.). In U.S. politics, "removal of an elected official," 1902.

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recall (v.)

1580s, "call back from a distance, to bring back by calling upon," from re- "back, again, to a former state" + call (v.); in some cases a loan-translation of French rappeler (see repeal (v.)) or Latin revocare "to rescind, call back" (see revoke).

A Latin-Germanic hybrid. The meaning "to revoke, take back, countermand" is by 1580s. The sense of "bring back to memory, call back to the mind or perception" is attested from 1610s. Related: Recalled; recalling.

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repeal (n.)

late 15c. (Caxton), "a recall," as from an exile (a sense now obsolete), from repeal (v.), or from Anglo-French repel, Old French rapel (Modern French rappel) "a recall appeal," back-formation from rapeler. The sense of "revocation, abrogation" is from c. 1500.

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disinvite (v.)

"recall an invitation to," 1570s; see dis- + invite. Related: Disinvited; disinviting. Compare uninvite.

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rappel (n.)

mountaineering technique for descending steep faces, 1931, from French rappel, literally "recall" (Old French rapel), from rapeler "to recall, summon" (see repeal (v.), which is a doublet). The same word had been borrowed into English earlier to mean "a drum roll to summon soldiers" (1848). For spelling, see rally (v.1).

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anamnestic (adj.)
1753, from Latinized form of Greek anamnestikos "able to recall to mind," from stem of anamimneskein "remember" (see anamnesis).
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remind (v.)

1640s, "to remember, recall (something) to one's mind" (a sense now obsolete); 1650s as "put (someone) in mind of (something), bring to the remembrance of;" from re- "again" + mind (v.). A Latin-Germanic hybrid. Related: Reminded; reminding.

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relive (v.)

also re-live, 1540s, "to come to life again, revive" (also "to restore to life again, recall to life," a sense now archaic), from re- "back, again" + live (v.). Meaning "to experience (an incident, a period of time) over again" is attested from 1711. Related: Relived; reliving.

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recognize (v.)

early 15c., recognisen, "resume possession of land," a back-formation from recognizance, or else from Old French reconoiss-, present-participle stem of reconoistre "to know again, identify, recognize," from Latin recognoscere "acknowledge, recall to mind, know again; examine; certify," from re- "again" (see re-) + cognoscere "to get to know, recognize" (see cognizance).

With ending assimilated to verbs in -ise, -ize. The meaning "know (the object) again, recall or recover the knowledge of, perceive an identity with something formerly known or felt" is recorded from 1530s. Related: Recognized; recognizing.

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remember (v.)

mid-14c., remembren, "keep or bear (something or someone) in mind, retain in the memory, preserve unforgotten," from Old French remembrer "remember, recall, bring to mind" (11c.), from Latin rememorari "recall to mind, remember," from re- "again" (see re-) + memorari "be mindful of," from memor "mindful" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember").

The meaning "recall to mind, bring again to the memory" is from late 14c.; the sense of "to mention" is from 1550s. Also in Middle English "to remind" (someone), "bring back the memory of" (something to someone); "give an account, narrate," and in passive constructions such as hit remembreth me "I remember." An Anglo-Saxon verb for it was gemunan.

The insertion of -b- between -m- and a following consonant (especially where a vowel has dropped out) is regular: compare number (n.), chamber (n.), humble (adj.).

Remember implies that a thing exists in the memory, not that it is actually present in the thoughts at the moment, but that it recurs without effort. Recollect means that a fact, forgotten or partially lost to memory, is after some effort recalled and present to the mind. Remembrance is the store-house, recollection the act of culling out this article and that from the repository. He remembers everything he hears, and can recollect any statement when called on. The words, however, are often confounded, and we say we cannot remember a thing when we mean we cannot recollect it. [Century Dictionary, 1895]

In complimentary messages, "remember (one) to (another), recall one to the remembrance of another," as in remember me to your family, is attested from 1550s.

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