Etymology
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rebuke (n.)

early 15c., "a reproof for fault or wrong, a direct reprimand," also "an insult, a rebuff," nd in the now archaic sense of "a shame, disgrace," from rebuke (v.). From mid-15c. as "a setback, a defeat."

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rebuke (v.)

early 14c., rebuken, "to reprimand, reprove directly and pointedly; chide, scold," from Anglo-French rebuker "to repel, beat back," Old French rebuchier, from re- "back" (see re-) + buschier "to strike, chop wood," from busche (French bûche) "wood," from a West Germanic *busk "bush, thicket" (see bush (n.)). Related: Rebuked; rebuking; rebukingly.

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snub (n.)
"rebuke, intentional slight," 1530s, from snub (v.).
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blame (n.)
early 13c., "an act or expression of disapproval, rebuke, etc., for something deemed wrong;" mid-14c., "responsibility for something that is wrong, culpability," from Old French blasme "blame, reproach; condemnation," a back-formation from blasmer "to rebuke" (see blame (v.)).
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reprehension (n.)

"blame, censure, reproof; a rebuke," late 14c., reprehensioun, from Old French reprehension (12c.) and directly from Latin reprehensionem (nominative reprehensio) "blame, a censure, reprimand," literally "a taking again," noun of action from past participle stem of reprehendere "to blame, censure, rebuke; seize, restrain" (see reprehend).

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reprehend (v.)

"to blame, censure, rebuke, reproach, charge with a fault," mid-14c., reprehenden, from Latin reprehendere "to blame, censure, rebuke; seize, restrain," literally "pull back, hold back," from re- "back" (see re-) + prehendere "to grasp, seize" (from prae- "before," see pre-, + -hendere, from PIE root *ghend- "to seize, take").

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reproof (n.)

mid-14c., "a shame, a disgrace" (a sense now obsolete), also "a censure to one's face, a rebuke addressed to a person," from Old French reprove "reproach, rejection," verbal noun from reprover "to blame, accuse" (see reprove).

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irreprehensible (adj.)
"blameless," late 14c., from Late Latin irreprehensibilis, from Latin irreprehensus "blameless, without blame," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + reprehensibilis, from past participle stem of Latin reprehendere "to blame, censure, rebuke; seize, restrain" (see reprehend).
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reprehensible (adj.)

"blameworthy, deserving to be censured," late 14c., from Old French reprehensible (14c.) and directly from Late Latin reprehensibilis "blamable," from reprehens-, past-participle stem of Latin reprehendere "to blame, censure, rebuke; seize, restrain" (see reprehend). Reprehendable in the same sense is from mid-14c. Reprehendatory (1853) was used in the sense of "conveying reproof." Related: Reprehensibly; reprehensibleness; reprehensibility.

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hit (n.)
late 15c., "a rebuke;" 1590s, "a blow, stroke," from hit (v.). Meaning "successful play, song, person," etc., 1811, is from the verbal sense of "to hit the mark, succeed" (c. 1400). Underworld slang meaning "a killing" is from 1970, from the criminal slang verb meaning "to kill by plan" (1955). Meaning "dose of narcotic" is 1951, from phrases such as hit the bottle.
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