Etymology
Advertisement
ramble (v.)

mid-15c., ramblen, "to wander, roam about in a leisurely manner," perhaps frequentative of romen "to walk, go" (see roam), perhaps via romblen (late 14c.) "to ramble." The vowel change is perhaps by influence of Middle Dutch rammelen, a derivative of rammen "copulate," "used of the night wanderings of the amorous cat" [Weekley], or the Middle English word might be from the Dutch one. Meaning "to talk or write incoherently" is from 1630s. Related: Rambled; rambling.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ramble (n.)

"a roving, an act of wandering for recreation or pleasure," especially a leisurely walk in varying directions, 1650s, from ramble (v.).

Related entries & more 
rambling (adj.)

1620s, "wandering about from place to place," present-participle adjective from ramble (v.). From 1630s as "wandering from topic to topic."

Related entries & more 
rambler (n.)

"a rover, a wanderer," 1620s, agent noun from ramble (v.). The Nash Rambler U.S. automobile was produced 1950-55.

Related entries & more 
saunter (n.)

"a leisurely stroll, a ramble," 1828, from saunter (v.). Earlier it meant "idle occupation, diversion" (1728); "leisurely, careless way of walking" (1712).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
divagation (n.)

"a wandering; deviation, digression," 1550s, noun of action from Latin divagatus, past participle of divagari "to wander about," from assimilated form of dis- "apart, in different directions" (see dis-) + vagari "to wander, ramble," from vagus "strolling, wandering, rambling," figuratively "vacillating, uncertain," a word of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
strip (v.)

"make bare," early 13c., from Old English -striepan, -strypan "to plunder, despoil" (as in West Saxon bestrypan "to plunder"), from Proto-Germanic *straupijan (source also of Middle Dutch stropen "to strip off, to ramble about plundering," Old High German stroufen "to strip off, plunder," German streifen "strip off, touch upon, to ramble, roam, rove"). Meaning "to unclothe" is recorded from early 13c. Intransitive sense from late 14c. Of screw threads, from 1839; of gear wheels, from 1873. Meaning "perform a strip-tease" is from 1929. Related: Stripped; stripping. Strip poker is attested from 1916, in a joke in The Technology Monthly and Harvard Engineering Journal:

"Say, Bill how, did the game come out?"
"It ended in a tie."
"Oh, were you playing strip poker?"

Strip search is from 1947, in reference to World War II prison camps.

Related entries & more 
divagate (v.)

"wander about, stray from place to place," 1590s, from Latin divagatus, past participle of divagari "to wander about," from assimilated form of dis- "apart, in different directions" (see dis-) + vagari "to wander, ramble," from vagus "strolling, wandering, rambling," figuratively "vacillating, uncertain," a word of unknown origin. Related: Divagated; divagating.

Related entries & more 
perambulate (v.)

"walk through, about, or over," 1560s, from Latin perambulatus, past participle of perambulare "to walk through, go through, ramble through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Related: Perambulated; perambulating.

Related entries & more 
scramble (n.)

1670s, "an eager, rude contest or struggle" with others for something or a chance of something, from scramble (v.). Meaning "a walk or ramble involving clambering and struggling with obstacles" is from 1755. Meaning "a rapid take-off" of an aircraft group is attested from 1940, R.A.F. slang, transitive and intransitive. In U.S. football, as a quarterback's move to avoid tacklers, by 1971. Middle English had scramblement (mid-15c.).

Related entries & more