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radicant (adj.)

1735, in botany, "bringing forth roots," from Latin radicantem (nominative radicans), present participle of radicare "to take root," from radix "root" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root").

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radicular (adj.)

"belonging to, pertaining to, or affecting roots; characterized by the presence of radicles," by 1815, from radicle or else from Modern Latin radicula, diminutive of Latin radix "root" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root") + -ar.

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radicand (n.)

in mathematics, the number under a radical sign, by 1843, from German, from Modern Latin radicandus, gerundive of radicare "to take root," from radix "root" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root").

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radicate (v.)

"cause to take root," late 15c., from Late Latin radicatus, past participle of radicare "to take root," from radix "root" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root"). Middle English also had radicacion (c. 1500) "fact or condition of being rooted." 

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radicate (adj.)

"fastened, attached, rooted," early 15c., from Late Latin radicatus, past participle of radicare "to take root," from radix "root" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root"). Botanical sense of "having a root" is by 1866.

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eradication (n.)

early 15c., from Latin eradicationem (nominative eradicatio), noun of action from past participle stem of eradicare "root out, extirpate, annihilate," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + radix (genitive radicis) "root" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root").

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radicle (n.)

1670s, in botany, "rootlet, part of the embryo of a plant which develops into the primary root," from Latin radicula, diminutive of radix "root" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root"). Anatomical sense of "branch of a nerve, vein, etc. resembling a root" is by 1830.

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irradicable (adj.)

"that cannot be rooted out," 1728, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + radicable, from Latin radix "root" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root"). Latin radicare meant "to take root," and English irradicate (v.) means both "root out" (1709) and "to root, fix by the root" (1660s).

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radish (n.)

cruciferous plant cultivated from antiquity for its crisp, slightly pungent, edible root, Middle English radich, from late Old English rædic "radish," from Latin radicem (nominative radix) "root, radish" (from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root"). The spelling in English is perhaps influenced by Old French radise, variant of radice, from Vulgar Latin *radicina, from radicem.

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ramus (n.)

in anatomy, "a branch or branching part," 1803, from Latin ramus "a branch, bough, twig," from earlier *radmo- and cognate with radix "root," from PIE root *wrād- "branch, root." This is the old reconstruction, which de Vaan, after some hesitation, finds justified. Related: Ramulous; ramulose.

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