Etymology
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questioner (n.)

"one who asks questions or has doubts," early 15c., questiouner, agent noun from question (v.).Questionist is attested from 1510s.

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asker (n.)
"questioner," late 14c., agent noun from ask (v.).
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questionnaire (n.)

"list of questions by which information is sought from a select group," 1901, from French questionnaire "list of formal questions," from questionner "to question," (see question (v.)). Purists long resisted it, preferring the native formation questionary (mid-15c. as "a scholastic questioner"); see -ary.

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question (v.)

late 15c., questiounen, "to inquire, ask, seek to know," from question (n.) and from Old French questioner "ask questions, interrogate, torture" (13c.), from question (n.). Hence "to dispute, doubt," by 1530s. Transitive sense of "inquire of by asking questions" is from late 15c. Related: Questioned; questioning. Alternative verb questionize is attested from 1847.

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interlocutor (n.)
1510s, "one who speaks in a dialogue or conversation," agent noun from Latin interlocut-, past participle stem of interloqui "speak between; interrupt," from inter "between" (see inter-) + loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").

In minstrel shows, the name of a straight-man character (1870) who was the questioner of the end men. Related: Interlocutory. Fem. forms include interlocutress (1858), interlocutrix (1846), interlocutrice (1848).
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