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question (n.)

early 13c., questioun, "philosophical or theological problem" (especially when phrased as an interrogative statement), early 14c. as "utterance meant to elicit an answer or discussion," also as "a difficulty, a doubt," from Anglo-French questiun, Old French question "question, difficulty, problem; legal inquest, interrogation, torture," and directly from Latin quaestionem (nominative quaestio) "a seeking, a questioning, inquiry, examining, judicial investigation," noun of action from past-participle stem of quaerere "ask, seek" (see query (v.)).

Also in Middle English "verbal contention, debate; legal proceedings, litigation, accusation." Phrase a question of meaning "a dispute about" is from early 15c.

No question "undoubtedly" is from mid-15c; no questions asked "accountability not required" is from 1879 (especially in newspaper advertisements seeking the return of something lost or stolen). To be out of the question (c. 1700) is to be not pertinent to the subject, hence "not to be considered." To be in question "under discussion or consideration" is from 1610s.

Question mark is from 1849, sometimes also question stop (1862), earlier interrogation point (1590s). The figurative sense of "something about which there is uncertainty or doubt" is from 1869.  

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question (v.)

late 15c., questiounen, "to inquire, ask, seek to know," from question (n.) and from Old French questioner "ask questions, interrogate, torture" (13c.), from question (n.). Hence "to dispute, doubt," by 1530s. Transitive sense of "inquire of by asking questions" is from late 15c. Related: Questioned; questioning. Alternative verb questionize is attested from 1847.

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unquestioned (adj.)
c. 1600, "not interrogated;" 1620s, "not to be opposed or disputed," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of question (v.).
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questioning (n.)

"the act of interrogating," c. 1600, verbal noun from question (v.). Questioning pitch for "rising intonation of an interrogative sentence" is by 1906.

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questioner (n.)

"one who asks questions or has doubts," early 15c., questiouner, agent noun from question (v.).Questionist is attested from 1510s.

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questionnaire (n.)

"list of questions by which information is sought from a select group," 1901, from French questionnaire "list of formal questions," from questionner "to question," (see question (v.)). Purists long resisted it, preferring the native formation questionary (mid-15c. as "a scholastic questioner"); see -ary.

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questionable (adj.)

1580s, "that may be interrogated" (a sense now obsolete); c. 1600, of facts, claims, etc., "open to dispute, doubtful," from question (v.) + -able. Deprecatory sense of "dubious in character" is attested from 1806. Related: Questionably.

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interrogative (adj.)
"asking or denoting a question," c. 1500, from Late Latin interrogativus "pertaining to a question," from interrogat-, past participle stem of Latin interrogare "to ask, question, inquire; interrogate judicially, cross-examine," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rogare "to ask, to question," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line." As a noun, "word implying a question," 1520s. Related: Interrogatively.
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interrogatory (adj.)
"containing or expressing a question," 1570s, from Late Latin interrogatorius "consisting of questions," from past participle stem of Latin interrogare "to ask, question, inquire; interrogate judicially, cross-examine," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rogare "to ask, to question," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line."
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interrogation (n.)
late 14c., "a question;" c. 1500, "a questioning; a set of questions," from Old French interrogacion "a questioning" (13c.) or directly from Latin interrogationem (nominative interrogatio) "a question; questioning; judicial inquiry," noun of action from past participle stem of interrogare "to ask, question, inquire; interrogate judicially, cross-examine," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rogare "to ask, to question," apparently a figurative use of a PIE verb meaning literally "to stretch out (the hand)," from root *reg- "move in a straight line."
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