Etymology
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push-off (n.)

"act of pushing off" (a boat, from the land), 1902, from the verbal phrase; see push (v.) + off (adv.).

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putt (n.)

1660s, originally figurative, "a putting, pushing, shoving, thrusting," special Scottish use and pronunciation of put (n.). Golfing sense of "to play with a putter" is from 1743.

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boost (v.)

"to lift or raise by pushing from behind," 1815, literal and figurative, American English, a word of unknown origin. Related: Boosted; boosting. As a noun, "a lift, a shove up, an upward push," by 1825.

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impulsion (n.)

early 15c., "a driving, pushing, thrusting," from Old French impulsion (14c.), from Latin impulsionem (nominative impulsio) "external pressure," figuratively "incitement, instigation," noun of action from past participle stem of impellere (see impel).

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punt (v.2)

"to propel as a punt is usually moved," by pushing with a pole against the bed of the body of water, 1816, from punt (n.2). Related: Punted; punting.

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go-ahead (adj.)

by 1840, "pushing, driving," from verbal phrase go ahead; see go (v.) + ahead (adv.). Go ahead as a command or invitation to proceed is from 1831, American English.

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Barnum 

surname taken as the type of excessive hype and promotion, by 1850s, from circus owner P.T. Barnum (1810-1891), described in OED as "a pushing American show-proprietor." The surname is from the place-name Barnham.

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scuffle (v.)

"to push or fight in a disorderly manner, struggle confusedly at close quarters," 1570s (transitive), 1580s (intransitive), probably a frequentative form of scuff (v.), but OED is against this; perhaps ultimately of Scandinavian origin. Related: Scuffled; scuffling. As a noun, "a confused pushing or struggle," c. 1600, from the verb.

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hustle (n.)

"pushing activity; activity in the interest of success," 1891, American English, from hustle (v.) in its later colloquial senses; earlier the noun meant "a shaking together" (1715). Sense of "a swindle, illegal business activity" is by 1963, American English. As the name of a popular dance, by 1975.

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kick-start (v.)

1919 (implied in kick-starter), "method of starting an internal combustion engine (of a motorcycle) by pushing down a lever with the foot," from kick (n.) + start (n.). Figurative sense of "take a course of action that will quickly start a process" is by 1995.

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