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prudence (n.)

mid-14c. (c. 1200 as a surname), "intelligence; discretion, foresight; practical wisdom to see what is suitable or profitable;" also one of the four cardinal virtues, "wisdom to see what is virtuous;" from Old French prudence (13c.) and directly from Latin prudentia "a foreseeing, foresight, sagacity, practical judgment," contraction of providentia "foresight" (see providence, which is a doublet). The secondary sense of "knowledge, science" (late 14c.) is preserved in jurisprudence.

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jurisprudence (n.)
1620s, "systematic knowledge of law," from French jurisprudence (17c.) and directly from Late Latin iurisprudentia "the science of law," from iuris "of right, of law" (genitive of ius; see jurist) + prudentia "knowledge, a foreseeing" (see prudence). Meaning "the philosophy of law" is first attested 1756. Related: Jurisprudent; jurisprudential.
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prudential (adj.)

"involving or characterized by prudence," mid-15c., prudencial, from Medieval Latin prudentialis, from Latin prudentia "a foreseeing, foresight" (see prudence). Related: Prudentially.

Prudential, the U.S. insurance company, dates to the 1870s; its logo featuring the Rock of Gibraltar dates from c. 1900 and was widely known 20c. The Prudential of Great Britain is a different company, founded 1848 to provide loans to professional and working people, noted for its door-to-door agents ("the Man from the Pru").

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sophrosyne (n.)
the quality of wise moderation; Greek, "prudence, moderation in desires, discretion, temperance," from sophron "of sound mind, prudent, temperate" (see Sophronia).
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Metis 

Greek goddess personifying prudence, first wife of Zeus, from Greek Mētis, literally "advice, wisdom, counsel; cunning, skill, craft," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure."

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forethought (n.)
early 14c., "a thinking beforehand, the act of planning," verbal noun from forethink "think of something beforehand," from Old English foreþencan "to premeditate, consider;" see fore- + think. Meaning "prudence, provident care" is from 1719.
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foresight (n.)
also fore-sight, early 14c., "insight obtained beforehand;" also "prudence," from fore- + sight (n.). Perhaps modeled on Latin providentia. Compare German Vorsicht "attention, caution, cautiousness."
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forecast (n.)
early 15c., "forethought, prudence," probably from forecast (v.). Meaning "conjectured estimate of a future course" is from 1670s. A Middle English word for weather forecasting (also divination by reading signs in the clouds or weather) was aeromancy (late 14c.).
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purveyance (n.)

c. 1300, purveiaunce, "foresight, foreknowledge, prudence, wisdom" (senses now obsolete), from Anglo-French purveance and directly from Old French porveance, pourveance, from Latin providentia (see providence). From early 14c. as "that which is needed or provided," late 14c. as "act of providing or procuring what is necessary, preliminary arrangement."

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