Etymology
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garment (n.)

c. 1400, "any article of clothing," reduced form of garnement (early 14c.), from Old French garnement "garment, attire, clothes" (12c.), from garnir "fit out, provide, adorn," from a Germanic source (compare garnish (v.)), from PIE root *wer- (4) "to cover."

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protective (adj.)

"affording protection, sheltering, defensive," 1660s, from protect + -ive. As a noun from 1875. Related: Protectively; protectiveness. Protective custody is from 1936, translating German Schutzhaft, used cynically by the Nazis. The notion is "adopted or intended to afford protection."

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protectant (adj.)

1660s, "protective, protecting (something) against disease," irregularly formed from protect + -ant. As a noun, "a protective substance or agent," from 1935.

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overprotective (adj.)

also over-protective, "that protects to an undue or unhealthy extent," 1930, from over- + protective. Related: Overprotectively; overprotectiveness.

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nanny (v.)
"to be unduly protective," 1954, from nanny (n.). Related: Nannied; nannying.
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face-plate (n.)
"protective cover, shield," 1874, from face (n.) + plate (n.).
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goggles (n.)
"spectacles, protective eyeglasses," 1715; see goggle.
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shadow-box (n.)
protective display case, 1892, from shadow (n.) + box (n.1).
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mailed (adj.)

"having mail armor," late 14c., from mail (n.2). Of animals having protective skin or scales, by 1680s.

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wrapper (n.)
late 15c., "piece of fine cloth used for wrapping bread," agent noun from wrap (v.). Meaning "disposable protective covering" is from 1808.
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