Etymology
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embankment (n.)

"a mound, bank, dike, or earthwork raised for any purpose," 1766, from embank "to enclose with a bank" (1570s; see em- (1) + bank (n.2)) + -ment.

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protective (adj.)

"affording protection, sheltering, defensive," 1660s, from protect + -ive. As a noun from 1875. Related: Protectively; protectiveness. Protective custody is from 1936, translating German Schutzhaft, used cynically by the Nazis. The notion is "adopted or intended to afford protection."

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protectant (adj.)

1660s, "protective, protecting (something) against disease," irregularly formed from protect + -ant. As a noun, "a protective substance or agent," from 1935.

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overprotective (adj.)

also over-protective, "that protects to an undue or unhealthy extent," 1930, from over- + protective. Related: Overprotectively; overprotectiveness.

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nanny (v.)
"to be unduly protective," 1954, from nanny (n.). Related: Nannied; nannying.
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face-plate (n.)
"protective cover, shield," 1874, from face (n.) + plate (n.).
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goggles (n.)
"spectacles, protective eyeglasses," 1715; see goggle.
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shadow-box (n.)
protective display case, 1892, from shadow (n.) + box (n.1).
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mound (v.)

1510s, "to enclose with a fence;" c. 1600 as "to enclose or fortify with an embankment;" see mound (n.). From 1859 as "to heap up." Related: Mounded; mounding.

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levee (n.1)
1719, "natural or artificial embankment to prevent overflow of a river," from New Orleans French levée "a raising, a lifting; an embankment," from French levée, literally "a rising" (as of the sun), noun use of fem. past participle of lever "to raise," from Latin levare "to raise, lift up; make lighter" (from PIE root *legwh- "not heavy, having little weight"). They also were used as landing places.
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