Etymology
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product (n.)

early 15c., "mathematical quantity obtained by multiplication," from Medieval Latin productum, in classical Latin "something produced," noun use of neuter past participle of producere "bring forth" (see produce (v.)). General sense of "anything produced" is attested in English from 1570s; political economy sense of "what is produced commercially for sale" is by 1890.

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by-product (n.)
also byproduct, "secondary or additional product;" 1849, from by + product.
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GNP (n.)
abbreviation of gross national product, attested by 1953.
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flip-top (adj.)
1955, of product packaging, from flip (v.) + top (n.1).
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commodify (v.)

"to convert into a (mere) commercial product or activity," 1971, back-formation from commodification. Related: Commodified; commodifying.

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one-off (n.)

"single example of a manufactured product," by 1927, from one + off. Later given figurative extension.

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additive (n.)
"something that is added" to a chemical solution or food product, 1945, from additive (adj.).
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distillate (n.)

"product of distillation, a fluid found in the receiver of a distilling apparatus," 1845; see distill + -ate (1).

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detergent (n.)

"detergent substance," 1670s, from detergent (adj.). Originally a medical term; application to "chemical cleansing product" is by 1932.

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Pez 
Austrian candy product, in U.S. use by 1956, said to be from letters in German Pfefferminz "peppermint."
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