Etymology
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procreation (n.)

late 14c., procreacioun, "process of begetting offspring, generation and production of young," from Old French procreacion (14c., Modern French prócreation) and directly from Latin procreationem (nominative procreatio) "a begetting, generation," noun of action from past-participle stem of procreare "bring forth" (offspring), "beget, generate, produce," from pro "forth" (see pro-) + creare "create" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow"). Spelling with -t- in English begins mid-15c.

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procreant (adj.)

"fruitful, producing young, related to or connected with reproduction," 1580s, from Latin procreantem (nominative procreans), present participle of procreare "to beget" (see procreation). As a noun, "one who or that which procreates," from c. 1600.

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procreator (n.)

"one who begets, a father or sire," 1540s, from French procreateur or directly from Latin procreator, from past-participle stem of procreare "to bring forth" offspring (see procreation). Fem. forms procreatrix, procreatress "a mother" are from 1590s.

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*ker- (2)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to grow."

It forms all or part of: accretion; accrue; cereal; Ceres; concrete; create; creation; creature; Creole; crescendo; crescent; crew (n.) "group of soldiers;" croissant; cru; decrease; Dioscuri; excrescence; excrescent; griot; increase; Kore; procerity; procreate; procreation; recreate; recreation; recruit; sincere.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek kouros "boy," korē "girl;" Latin crescere "come forth, spring up, grow, thrive, swell," Ceres, goddess of agriculture, creare "to bring forth, create, produce;" Armenian serem "bring forth," serim "be born."

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-genesis 

word-forming element meaning "birth, origin, creation," from Greek genesis "origin, creation, generation," from gignesthai "to be born," related to genos "race, birth, descent" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).

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procreate (v.)

"beget, generate, engender (children)," 1530s, a back-formation from procreation or else from Latin procreatus, past participle of procreare "bring forth" (offspring), "beget, generate, produce," from pro "forth" (see pro-) + creare "create" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow"). Related: Procreated; procreating.

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genus (n.)

(Latin plural genera), 1550s as a term of logic, "kind or class of things" (biological sense dates from c. 1600), from Latin genus (genitive generis) "race, stock, kind; family, birth, descent, origin" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).

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virility (n.)

"period of manhood," 1580s, from French virilité, from Latin virilitatem (nominative virilitas) "manhood," from virilis "of a man, manly, worthy of a man," from vir "a man, a hero," from PIE root *wi-ro- "man." Meaning "power of procreation, capacity for sexual intercourse" is from 1590s; sense of "manly strength" is recorded from c. 1600.

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naeve (n.)

"spot or blemish on the skin," 1610s, from Latin naevus "mole, birthmark, wart," from *gnaevus "birthmark," literally "born in" (from PIE root *gene- "to give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to aspects and results of procreation). Now obsolete; the Latin form has been used since c. 1835 in anatomy and zoology.

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gens (n.)

1847, in reference to ancient Rome, "tribe, clan, house (of families having a name and certain religious rites in common and a presumed common origin)," from Latin gens (genitive gentis) "race, clan, nation" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).

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