Etymology
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proclamation (n.)

late 14c., proclamacioun, "act of making public," also "that which is proclaimed;" from Old French proclamacion (14c., Modern French proclamation) and directly from Late Latin proclamationem (nominative proclamatio) "a calling out, crying out," noun of action from past-participle stem of proclamare "to cry or call out" (see proclaim).

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pronouncement (n.)

"act of pronouncing; a proclamation or formal announcement," 1590s, from pronounce + -ment.

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edict (n.)
late 15c., edycte; earlier edit (late 13c.), "proclamation having the force of law," from Old French edit, from Latin edictum "proclamation, ordinance, edict," neuter past participle of edicere "publish, proclaim," from assimilated form of ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + dicere "to say" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly"). Related: Edictal.
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banns (n.)
"proclamation or notice given in a church of an intended marriage," mid-15c. (late 12c. in Anglo-Latin), from Old English bannan "to summon, command, proclaim" (see ban (v.)). Also probably partly from Old French ban "announcement, proclamation, banns, authorization," from Frankish *ban or some other Germanic cognate of the Old English word. They were made part of ecclesiastic legislation 1215 by the fourth Lateran council.
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contraband (n.)

1520s, "smuggling, illegal or prohibited traffic;" 1590s, "smuggled goods, anything by law forbidden to be imported or exported;" from French contrebande "a smuggling," from older Italian contrabando (modern contrabbando) "unlawful dealing," etymologically "contrary to proclamation," from Latin contra "against" (see contra (prep., adv.)) + Medieval Latin bannum, from Frankish *ban "a command" or some other Germanic source (see ban (v.)).  As an adjective, "prohibited by law, proclamation, or treaty," 1650s. 

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ban (n.1)

c. 1300, "proclamation or edict of an overlord," from Old English (ge)bann "proclamation, summons, command" and cognate Old French ban "decree, announcement," which is from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *bannaz (source also of Old Frisian bon "order, commandment; jurisdiction, penalty; eternal damnation, excommunication," Old Saxon bann "commandment, prohibition"), from *bannan "to speak publicly" (used in reference to various sorts of proclamations), "command; summon; outlaw, forbid" (see ban (v.)). Meaning "an authoritative prohibition" is from 1660s. There are noun forms in most of the Germanic languages, from the verbs. Compare banns.

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oyez (interj.)

a call for silence and attention; the introduction to a proclamation made by an officer of a law-court," early 15c., from Anglo-French oyez "hear ye!" (late 13c., Old French oiez), a cry uttered (usually thrice) to call attention, from Latin subjunctive audiatis, plural imperative of audire "to hear" (from PIE root *au- "to perceive").

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pronunciation (n.)

early 15c., pronunciacioun, "mode in which a word is pronounced," from Old French prononciacion (13c.) and directly from Latin pronuntiationem (nominative pronuntiatio) "act of speaking, utterance, delivery," also "proclamation, public declaration," noun of action from past-participle stem of pronuntiare "announce" (see pronounce). The -t- was restored in the English word 16c.

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kerygma (n.)

"preaching," 1879, from Greek kērygma "proclamation, that which is cried by a herald, public notice," used in the Greek New Testament for "preaching," from kēryssein "to proclaim, to cry (as a herald)," from or related to kēryx "herald, messenger," a word of uncertain origin, perhaps from PIE root *kar- (2) "to praise loudly," but Beekes says probably pre-Greek. Related: Kerygmatic.

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emancipation (n.)

1630s, "a setting free," from French émancipation, from Latin emancipationem (nominative emancipatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of emancipare (see emancipate).

In modern use especially of the freeing of a minor from parental control. Specifically with reference to U.S. slavery from 1785 (the Emancipation Proclamation was issued July 22, 1862, effective Jan. 1, 1863). In Britain, with reference to easing of restrictions on Catholics, etc.

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