Etymology
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propose (v.)

mid-14c., proposen, "form a design or intention;" late 14c., "put forward or offer for consideration;" from Old French proposer "propose, advance, suggest" (12c.), from pro "forth" (see pro-) + poser "put, place" (see pose (v.1)). The notion is "place before as something to be done." The French word took the place of Latin proponare (for this substitution, see pose (v.1)). The meaning "make an offer of marriage" is attested by 1764. Related: Proposed; proposing. See also propone, which coexisted with this word for a time.

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proposal (n.)

"a plan or scheme offered for acceptance," 1650s, from propose + -al (2); specific sense of "offer of marriage" is by 1749.

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proposition (v.)

"make or present a proposition," 1914, from proposition (n.). The older verb is propose. Specifically of sexual favors by 1936. Related: Propositioned; propositioning.

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purpose (v.)
Origin and meaning of purpose

late 14c., purposen, "to intend (to do or be something); put forth for consideration, propose," from Anglo-French purposer "to design," Old French purposer, porposer "to intend, propose," variant of proposer "propose, advance, suggest" (see propose).

Generally with an infinitive. Intransitive sense of "to have intention or design" is by mid-15c. According to Century Dictionary, "The verb should prop. be accented on the last syllable (as in propose, compose, etc.), but it has conformed to the noun," which is wholly from Latin while the verb is partly of different origin (see pose (n.2)).

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propound (v.)

"put forward, offer for consideration," a mid-16c. variant of Middle English proponen "to put forward, assert" (c. 1400), from Latin proponere "put forth, set forth, lay out, display, expose to view," figuratively "set before the mind; resolve; intend, design," from pro "before" (see pro-) + ponere "to put" (see position (n.)). With unetymological -d, perhaps by influence of compound, expound. The Latin verb in French was superseded by the word that became English propose (for which change see pose (v.1)). Related: Propounded; propounding.

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propone (v.)

"propose, put forward," c. 1400, proponen, from Latin proponere "to put forth, place before" (see propound). Related: Proponed; proponing; proponement.

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toast (v.2)

"to propose or drink a toast," 1700, from toast (n.2). This probably is the source of the Jamaican and African-American vernacular word meaning "extemporaneous narrative poem or rap" (1962). Related: Toasted; toasting.

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slate (v.)

1520s, "to cover with slates," from slate (n.). The earlier form was sclatten (late 15c.), and compare slater. The meaning "propose, schedule" is from 1883; earlier "to nominate" (1804); the notion is of writing on a slate board. Related: Slated; slating.

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motion (v.)

late 15c., "to request, petition" (obsolete), from motion (n.). The sense in parliamentary procedure, "to propose, move" is by 1747; with meaning "to guide or direct by a significant sign, gesture, or movement," as with the hand or head, it is attested from 1787. Related: Motioned; motioning.

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apropos (adv.)

1660s, "opportunely," from French à propos "to the purpose," from propos "thing said in conversation, talk; purpose, plan," from Latin propositium "purpose," past participle of proponere "to set forth, propose" (see propound). The meaning "as regards, with reference to" (with of) is by 1761, from French. As an adjective, "to the point or purpose," from 1690s.

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