Etymology
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pottery (n.)

late 15c., "a potter's workshop, place where earthen vessels are made," from Old French poterie (13c.), from potier (see potter (n.)). Attested from 1727 as "the potter's art or business;" from 1785 as "potteryware, vessels made by a potter."

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wedgwood (n.)

type of English pottery, 1787, from Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795), English potter.

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ironstone (n.)

1520s, from iron (n.) + stone (n.). As a type of hard, white pottery, 1825.

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Pratt 

surname, apparently from Old English *prætt (adj.) "cunning, astute;" related to the late Old English noun prætt "a trick" (compare Middle English prat-wrench "a cunning trick;" see pretty (adj.)). As a type of pottery, named for Staffordshire pottery manufacturer Felix Pratt (1780-1859).

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email (n.)

type of pottery design pattern, 1853, from French email, earlier esmail (12c.), literally "enamel" (see enamel (n.)). Also now a variant of e-mail.

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majolica (n.)

1550s, "decorative enameled pottery," especially that of 15c.-17c. Italy, from Italian Majolica, 14c. name of island now known as Majorca in the Balearics. So called because the best pottery of this type was said to have been made there. Since 19c. the name has been applied to a kind of glazed ware which imitates it in intensity of color.

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glaze (v.)

late 14c. variant of Middle English glasen "to fit with glass," also "to make shine," from glas (see glass (n.)). The form probably influenced or reinforced by glazier. Of pottery, etc., "cover with a shiny or glossy substance," from c. 1400. Related: Glazed; glazing.

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geometric (adj.)

1620s, "pertaining to geometry," shortened form of geometrical (q.v.). In reference to a style of ancient Greek pottery decoration characterized by straight lines and angles, and the associated culture, 1902.

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redware (n.)

also red ware, a term used of several type of pottery since at least 1690s, from red (adj.1) + ware (n.). It also was a dialectal word for a type of seaweed.

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enamel (n.)

early 15c., in ceramics,  "a vitrified substance, either transparent or opaque, applied as a coating to pottery and porcelain," from enamel (v.). As "hardest part of a tooth," 1718, from a use in French émail.

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