Etymology
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presupposition (n.)

1530s, "surmise, conjecture, supposition antecedent to knowledge," from French présupposition and directly from Medieval Latin praesuppositionem (nominative praesuppositio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin praesupponere, from prae "before" (see pre-) + suppositio (see suppose). Meaning "postulation as of an antecedent condition," hence "a prerequisite" is from 1570s.

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postulate (n.)

1580s, "a request, demand, petition," from Latin postulātum "demand, request," properly "that which is requested," noun use of neuter past participle of postulare "to ask, demand; claim; require" (see postulate (v.)).

The sense in logic, "proposition proposed for acceptance without proof, something taken for granted," is from 1640s, from a sense in Medieval Latin. The meaning "self-evident practical proposition" is by 1751. The earlier noun in English was postulation "a petition, request" (c. 1400). Middle English also had postulate (adj.) "nominated to a bishopric or archbishopric" (mid-15c.).

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