Etymology
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positional (adj.)

"of or pertaining to position," 1570s, from position (n.) + -al (1).

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notation (n.)

1560s, "explanation of a term" (a sense now obsolete), from French notation (14c.) and directly from Latin notationem (nominative notatio) "a marking, notation, designation; etymology; shorthand; explanation," noun of action from past-participle stem of notare "to note" (see note (v.)). Meaning "a note, an annotation" is from 1580s. Meaning "system of representing numbers or quantities by signs or symbols" is attested from 1706. Related: Notational.

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Guidonian (adj.)
1721, in reference to the system of musical notation devised by Guido d'Arezzo, who lived early 11c.
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notate (v.)

"set down in musical notation," 1871, a back-formation from notation, or else from Latin notatus, past participle of notare "to mark, note, make a note," from nota "mark, sign, means of recognition" (see note (n.)). Related: Notated; notating.

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tablature (n.)
type of musical notation for lute or stringed instrument, 1570s, from French tablature (1550s), from Italian tavolatura (also Medieval Latin tabulatura), from Late Latin tabulare, from Latin tabula "table, list, schedule" (see table (n.)). "It differed from the more general staff-notation in that it aimed to express not so much the pitch of the notes intended as the mechanical process by which on the particular instrument those tones were to be produced" [Century Dictionary].
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breve (n.)
c. 1300, "letter of authority" (see brief (n.)); mid-15c. as a medieval musical notation having one-half or one-third the duration of a "long" note (longa), from Latin breve (adj.) "short" in space or time (see brief (adj.)). In modern use it has the value of two whole notes and is the longest notation (though seldom used), which reverses the etymological sense. The grammatical curved line placed over a vowel to indicate "shortness" (1540s) is from the same source.
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repeat (n.)

mid-15c., repete, in music, "a repeated passage, a passage performed a second time," from repeat (v.). By 1660s in reference to the sign in musical notation which indicates this. By 1937 of a repetition of a broadcast program.

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ligature (n.)

c. 1400, "something used in tying or binding," from Late Latin ligatura "a band," from Latin ligatus, past participle of ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). In modern musical notation, "group of notes slurred together," from 1590s; of letters joined in printing or writing from 1690s.

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crotchet (n.)

early 14c., "small hook;" mid-15c. "a staff with a hook at the end," from Old French crochet (pronounced "crotchet") "small hook; canine tooth" (12c.), diminutive of croc "hook," from Old Norse krokr "hook," which is of obscure origin but perhaps related to the widespread group of Germanic kr- words meaning "bent, hooked."

As a curved surgical instrument with a sharp hook, from 1750. Figurative use in musical notation for "quarter note" is from mid-15c., from the shape of the notes. Also from 1670s in now-obsolete sense "one of the pair of marks now called 'brackets.'"

Meaning "whimsical fancy, singular opinion," especially one held by someone who has no competency to form a sound one, is from 1570s; the sense is uncertain, perhaps it is the same mechanical image in extended senses of crank; but other authorities link it to the musical notation one (think: "too many notes").

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quotation (n.)

mid-15c., "numbering," later (1530s) "marginal notation," noun of action from quote (v.) or else from Medieval Latin quotationem (nominative quotatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of quotare "to number."

Meaning "an act of quoting or citing" is from 1640s; that of "passage quoted, that which is repeated or cited as the utterance of another speaker or writer" is from 1680s. Meaning "the current price of commodities or stocks, as published," is by 1812. Quotation mark, one of the marks to denote the beginning and end of a quotation, is attested by 1777.

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