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portrait (n.)

1560s, "a figure, drawn or painted," a back formation from portraiture or directly from French portrait, from Old French portret (13c.), noun use of past participle of portraire "to paint, depict" (see portray). Especially a picture or representation of the head and face of a person drawn from life. Related: Portraitist.

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self-portrait (n.)
1821, from self- + portrait, translating German Selbstbildnis.
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portraiture (n.)

"the art of making portraits; a painting, picture, or drawing," late 14c., from Old French portraiture "portrait, image, portrayal, resemblance" (12c.), from portrait (see portrait).

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iconic (adj.)
1650s, "of or pertaining to a portrait," from Late Latin iconicus, from Greek eikonikos "pertaining to an image," from eikon "likeness, image, portrait" (see icon). In art, applied to statues of victorious athletes, sovereigns, etc., 1801.
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face-painting (n.)
1706, "portrait-painting," from face (n.) + painting (n.). In reference to applying color to the face, by 1778. Related: Face-painter; face-paint.
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carte de visite (n.)
"photograph portrait mounted on a 3.5-inch-by-2.5-inch card," 1861, French, literally "visiting card," from carte (see card (n.1)) + visite, from visiter (see visit (v.).
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imagery (n.)
mid-14c., "piece of sculpture, carved figures," from Old French imagerie "figure" (13c.), from image "likeness, figure, drawing, portrait" (see image (n.)). Rhetorical meaning "ornate description, exhibition of images to the mind" (in poetry, etc.) is from 1580s.
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visage (n.)
c. 1300, from Anglo-French and Old French visage "face, coutenance; portrait," from vis "face, appearance," from Latin visus "a look, vision," from past participle stem of videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see"). Visagiste "make-up artist" is recorded from 1958, from French.
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simulacrum (n.)

1590s, from Latin simulacrum "likeness, image, form, representation, portrait," a dissimilation of *simulaclom, from simulare "to make like, imitate, copy, represent," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). The word was borrowed earlier as semulacre (late 14c.), via Old French simulacre.

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wart (n.)
Old English weart "wart," from Proto-Germanic *warton- (source also of Old Norse varta, Old Frisian warte, Dutch wrat, Old High German warza, German warze "wart"), perhaps ultimately from the same source as Latin verruca "swelling, wart." Phrase warts and all "without concealment of blemishes" is attested from 1763, supposedly from Oliver Cromwell's instruction to his portrait painter.
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