Etymology
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populate (v.)

"to people, inhabit; form or furnish the population of a country, etc.," 1610s, from Medieval Latin populatus, past participle of populare "inhabit, to people," from Latin populus "inhabitants, people, nation" (see people (n.)). Earlier in English it was an adjective, "peopled, populated" (1570s). Related: Populated; populating.

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overpopulate (v.)

also over-populate, "to overrun with too many people," 1828 (implied in overpopulated), from over- + populate (v.). Related: Overpopulating. Overpopulous "over-populated" is attested from 1670s.

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repopulate (v.)

also re-populate, "to people anew, supply with a new population," 1590s, from re- "again" + populate (v.). Related: Repopulated; repopulating; repopulation.

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depopulate (v.)

"deprive of inhabitants," 1540s; see de- + populate. Perhaps from Latin depopulatus, past participle of depopulari "to lay waste, ravage." Related: Depopulated; depopulating. Earlier in same sense was dispeplen (early 15c.).

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repeople (v.)

also re-people, "to populate again, fill again with people," late 15c.; see re- "again" + people (v.). Related: Repeopled; repeopling.

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people (v.)

mid-15c., peplen, "to provide (a land) with inhabitants" (transitive), also "inhabit, populate, fill or occupy as inhabitants" (intransitive, implied in peopled), from people (n.), or else from Old French popler, peupler, from Old French peuple. Related: Peopling.

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publish (v.)

mid-14c., publishen, "make publicly known, reveal, divulge, announce;" an alteration (by influence of banish, finish, etc.) of publicen (early 14c.), which is from the extended stem of Old French publier "make public, spread abroad, communicate," from Latin publicare "make public," from publicus "public, pertaining to the people" (see public (adj.)).

The meaning "issue (a book, etc.) to the public, cause to be printed and offered for sale or distribution" is from late 14c., also "to disgrace, put to shame; denounce publicly." Related: Published; publishing. In Middle English the verb also meant "to people, populate; to multiply, breed" (late 14c.), for example ben published of "be descended from."

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