Etymology
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playful (adj.)

"lighthearted, full of play, frolicsome, frisky," early 13c., pleiful, from play (n.) + -ful. Related: Playfully; playfulness.

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missy (n.)

"young girl," 1670s, playful or diminutive form of miss (n.2), at first chiefly among servants.

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kidder (v.)

"playful teaser," 1888, agent noun from kid (v.).

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ludic (adj.)

"spontaneously playful," 1940, a term in psychiatry, from French ludique, from Latin ludere "to play" (see ludicrous).

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Pocahontas 

(c. 1595-1617), daughter of Algonquian leader Powhatan, the name is said to be Algonquian Pokachantesu "she is playful."

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sporting (adj.)

c. 1600, "playful;" 1799 as "characterized by conduct constant with that of a sportsman" (as in sporting chance, 1897), present-participle adjective from sport (v.).

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lusory (adj.)

"playful," 1650s, from Latin lusorius "belonging to a player," from lusor "player," from stem of ludere "to play" (see ludicrous). Related: Lusorious (1610s).

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land (v.2)

"to make contact, to hit home" (of a blow, etc.), by 1881, perhaps altered from lend (v.) in a playful sense, or else a sense extension of land (v.1).

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mopsy (n.)

1580s, a term of endearment, from mop, playful name for a baby or a doll (mid-15c.; see moppet). By 1700 as "an untidy woman" (provincial).

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playable (adj.)

late 15c., plaiabil, "playful, sportive," from play (v.) + -able. Original sense is obsolete; the meaning "capable of being played" in various senses is from 1860. Related: Playability.

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