Etymology
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plash (n.)

"small puddle, shallow pool, wet ground," Old English plæsc "pool of water, puddle," probably imitative (compare plash (v.1) and Dutch plass "pool"). Meaning "noise made by splashing" is recorded by 1510s. Related: Plashy.

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plash (v.1)

"to splash, dabble in water," 1580s, from plash (n.) and also imitative (compare Dutch plassen, German platschen). An earlier form of splash. Related: Plashed; plashing.

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plash (v.2)

"to interlace, to bend and interweave the branches or twigs of," late 15c. (implied in plashing), from Old French plaissier, from Latin plectere "to plait," from suffixed form of PIE root *plek- "to plait." Related: Plashed.

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*plek- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to plait." It is an extended form of root *pel- (2) "to fold."

It forms all or part of: accomplice; application; apply; complex; complexion; complicate; complication; complicity; deploy; display; duplex; duplicate; duplicity; employ; explicate; explicit; exploit; flax; implex; implicate; implication; implicit; imply; multiply; perplex; perplexity; plait; plash (v.2) "to interlace;" pleat; -plex; plexus; pliable; pliant; plie; plight (n.1) "condition or state;" ply (v.1) "work with, use;" ply (v.2) "to bend; ply (n.) "a layer, fold;" replica; replicate; replication; reply; simplex; splay; triplicate.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit prasna- "turban;" Greek plekein "to plait, braid, wind, twine," plektos "twisted;" Latin plicare "to lay, fold, twist," plectere (past participle plexus) "to plait, braid, intertwine;" Old Church Slavonic plesti "to braid, plait, twist," Russian plesti; Gothic flahta "braid;" Old Norse fletta, Old High German flehtan "to plait;" Old English fleax "cloth made with flax, linen."
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splash (v.)
1715 (intransitive); 1722 (transitive), probably an alteration of plash with an intensive s-. Related: Splashed; splashing. Splash-board attested from 1826. Splash-down (n.) in the spacecraft sense is attested from 1961.
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