Etymology
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planning (n.)

"the forming or making of plans," 1748, verbal noun from plan (v.).

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plan (v.)

1728, "make a plan of; put on paper the parts, dimensions, and methods of construction of," from plan (n.). By 1737 as "to scheme, to devise ways and means for (the doing of something)." Related: Planned; planning; plans. Planned economy is attested by 1931. Planned Parenthood (1942) formerly was Birth Control Federation of America.

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zoning (n.)

"land-use planning," 1912, verbal noun from zone (v.).

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zone (v.)

1760, "mark with zones," from zone (n.). Land use planning sense is from 1916. Related: Zoned; zoning.

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grid (n.)

1839, shortening of gridiron or griddle. City planning sense is from 1954 (hence gridlock). Meaning "network of transmission lines" first recorded 1926.

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redevelop (v.)

also re-develop, 1852, "to develop again" in any sense; see re- "again" + develop. Specific city planning sense is by 1936. Related: Redeveloped; redeveloping.

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master-mind (n.)

1720, "an outstanding intellect," from master (n.) + mind (n.). Meaning "head of a criminal enterprise" is attested by 1872. As a verb (also mastermind), "to engage in the highest level of planning and execution of a major operation," from 1940. Related: Masterminded; masterminding.

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forethought (n.)

early 14c., "a thinking beforehand, the act of planning," verbal noun from forethink "think of something beforehand," from Old English foreþencan "to premeditate, consider;" see fore- + think. Meaning "prudence, provident care" is from 1719.

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estimation (n.)

late 14c., "action of appraising; manner of judging; opinion," from Old French estimacion "evaluation, value; calculation, planning," from Latin aestimationem (nominative aestimatio) "a valuation," from past participle stem of aestimare "to value" (see esteem (v.)). Meaning "appreciation" is from 1520s. That of "process of forming an approximate notion" is from c. 1400.

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apparel (n.)

c. 1300, appareil, "fighting equipment or accouterments, armor, weapons;" mid-14c., "furnishings, trappings;" late 14c., "personal outfit, a person's outer clothing, attire," from Old French apareil "preparation, planning; dress, vestments," from apareillier (see apparel (v.)). Middle English had also apparelment (late 14c.).

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