Etymology
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plagiarize (v.)

"to steal or purloin from the writings or ideas of another," 1716, from plagiary "plagiarist" (see plagiarism) + -ize. Related: Plagiarized; plagiarizing.

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plagiarist (n.)

"one who plagiarizes," 1670s; see plagiarism + -ist. The earlier noun in this sense was plagiary (c. 1600). Related: Plagiaristic.

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plagiarism (n.)

"the purloining or wrongful appropriation of another's ideas, writing, artistic designs, etc., and giving them forth as one's own," 1620s, from -ism + plagiary (n.) "plagiarist, literary thief" (c. 1600), from Latin plagiarius "kidnapper, seducer, plunderer, one who kidnaps the child or slave of another," used by Martial in the sense of "literary thief," from plagiare "to kidnap," plagium "kidnapping," from plaga "snare, hunting net" (also "open expanse, territory"), which is perhaps from PIE *plag- (on notion of "something extended"), variant form of root *plak- (1) "to be flat." De Vaan tentatively compares Greek plagia "sides, flanks," Old High German flah "flat," Old Saxon flaka "sole of the foot."

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