Etymology
Advertisement
piddle (v.)

1540s, "to spend time with unimportant matters, to work in a trifling way," a word of uncertain origin, apparently a frequentative form. Meaning "to pick at one's food" is from 1610s; that of "urinate" is from 1796 as a childish word. Related: Piddled; piddler; piddling.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
away (adv.)
late Old English aweg, earlier on weg "on from this (that) place;" see a- (1) + way (n.).

Meaning "from one's own or accustomed place" is from c. 1300; that of "from one state or condition to another" is from mid-14c.; that of "from one's possession (give away, throw away) is from c. 1400. Colloquial use for "without delay" (fire away, also right away) is from earlier sense of "onward in time" (16c.). Meaning "at such a distance" (a mile away) is by 1712. Intensive use (as in away back) is American English, attested by 1818. Of sporting events played at the other team's field or court, by 1893.
Related entries & more 
lay-away (n.)
also lay-away, 1961 in reference to a system of payments for reserved merchandise, from the verbal phrase (attested from c. 1400 as "to put away," especially "place in store for future use"); see lay (v.) + away (adv.). Earlier in the same sense, as an adjective, was Australian lay-by (1930).
Related entries & more 
get-away (n.)
also getaway, 1852, "an escape," originally in fox hunting, from verbal phrase get away "escape" (early 14c.); see get (v.) + away (adv.). Of prisoners or criminals from 1893.
Related entries & more 
keep-away (n.)
as a game, 1925, from verbal phrase (attested from late 14c.); see keep (v.) + away (adv.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
give-away (n.)
also giveaway, "act of giving away," 1872, from verbal phrase give away, c. 1400 (of brides from 1719); see give (v.) + away (adv.). The phrase in the meaning "to betray, expose, reveal" is from 1878, originally U.S. slang. Hence also Related: give-away (n.) "inadvertent betrayal or revelation" (1882).
Related entries & more 
far-away (adj.)
also faraway, "distant, remote," 1816, from far + away.
Related entries & more 
cut-away (adj.)

of coats, "cut back from the waist," 1841, from the verbal phrase; see cut (v.) + away. As a noun, "coat cut back from the waist," by 1849. In reference to models, drawings, etc., of which a part is cut away to reveal the interior, by 1946. The verbal phrase is from c. 1300 as "cut (something) off or away." 

Related entries & more 
piddling (adj.)
"insignificant, trifling," 1550s, present-participle adjective from piddle (v.).
Related entries & more 
piffle (v.)

1847, "to talk or act in a trifling and ineffective way," of unknown origin, perhaps an alteration of trifle, by influence of piddle, etc. Or perhaps imitative of a puff of air, with diminutive suffix -el (2). As a noun by 1890.

Related entries & more